Course Catalog

Subjects offered at HCC


  • ACA-111, Lecture: 1, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    College Student Success

    This course introduces the college's physical, academic, and social environment and promotes the personal development essential for success. Topics include campus facilities and resources; policies, procedures, and programs; study skills; and life management issues such as health, self-esteem, motivation, goal-setting, diversity, and communication. Upon completion, students should be able to function effectively within the college environment to meet their educational objectives.

  • ACA-115, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Success & Study Skills

    This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-setting, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully meet educational goals.

  • ACA-122, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    College Transfer Success

    This course provides information and strategies necessary to develop clear academic and professional goals beyond the community college experience. Topics include the CAA, college policies and culture, career exploration, gathering information on senior institutions, strategic planning, critical thinking, and communications skills for a successful academic transition. Upon completion, students should be able to develop an academic plan to transition successfully to senior institutions.

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    Accounting (ACC)

  • ACC-120, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Principles of Financial Accounting

    This course introduces business decision-making using accounting information systems. Emphasis is placed on analyzing, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations.

  • ACC-121, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Summer 2014
    Principles of Managerial Accounting

    This course includes a greater emphasis on managerial and cost accounting skills. Emphasis is placed on managerial accounting concepts for external and internal analysis, reporting and decision-making. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret transactions relating to managerial concepts including product-costing systems.

  • ACC-129, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Individual Income Taxes

    This course introduces the relevant laws governing individual income taxation. Topics include tax law, electronic research and methodologies, and the use of technology for preparation of individual income tax returns. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze basic tax scenarios, research applicable tax law, and complete various individual tax forms.

  • ACC-130, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Business Income Taxes

    This course introduces the relevant laws governing business and fiduciary income taxes. Topics include tax law relating to business organizations, electronic research and methodologies, and the use of technology for the preparation of business tax returns. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze basic tax scenarios, research applicable tax law, and complete various business tax forms.

  • ACC-140, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Payroll Accounting

    This course covers federal and state laws pertaining to wages, payroll taxes, payroll tax forms, and journal and general ledger transactions. Emphasis is placed on computing wages; calculating social security, income, and unemployment taxes; preparing appropriate payroll tax forms; and journalizing/posting transactions. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze data, make appropriate computations, complete forms, and prepare accounting entries using appropriate technology.

  • ACC-150, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Accounting Software Applications

    This course introduces microcomputer applications related to accounting systems. Topics include general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, inventory, payroll, and correcting, adjusting, and closing entries. Upon completion, students should be able to use a computer accounting package to solve accounting problems.

  • ACC-220, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Intermediate Accounting I

    This course is a continuation of the study of accounting principles with in-depth coverage of theoretical concepts and financial statements. Topics include generally accepted accounting principles and extensive analysis of balance sheet components. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, including the application of financial standards.

  • ACC-221, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Intermediate Accounting II

    This course is a continuation of ACC 220. Emphasis is placed on special problems which may include leases, bonds, investments, ratio analyses, present value applications, accounting changes, and corrections. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display an analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

  • ACC-225, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Cost Accounting

    This course introduces the nature and purposes of cost accounting as an information system for planning and control. Topics include direct materials, direct labor, factory overhead, process, job order, and standard cost systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display an analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered.

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    Agriculture (AGR)

  • AGR-265, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Organic Crop Production: Spring

    This course includes a study of spring organic crop production practices, including vegetables, cut flowers, and culinary and medicinal herbs. Topics include variety selection, production methods, and record keeping procedures for certification. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of organic crop production appropriate for the spring season.

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    Alternative Energy Technology (ALT)

  • ALT-120, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Renewable Energy Technologies

    This course provides an introduction to multiple technologies that allow for the production and conservation of energy from renewable sources. Topics include hydo-electric, wind power, passive and active solar energy, tidal energy, appropriate building techniques, and energy conservation methods. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of renewable energy production and its impact on humans and their environment.

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    Anthropology (ANT)

  • ANT-210, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    General Anthropology

    This course introduces the physical, archaeological, linguistic, and ethnological fields of anthropology. Topics include human origins, genetic variations, archaeology, linguistics, primatology, and contemporary cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the four major fields of anthropology.

  • ANT-220, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Cultural Anthropology

    This course introduces the nature of human culture. Emphasis is placed on cultural theory, methods of fieldwork, and cross-cultural comparisons in the areas of ethnology, language, and the cultural past. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic cultural processes and how cultural data are collected and analyzed.

  • ANT-230, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Physical Anthropology

    This course introduces the scientific study of human evolution and adaptation. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary theory, population genetics, biocultural adaptation and human variation, as well as non-human primate evolution, morphology, and behavior. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the biological and cultural processes which have resulted in the formation of the human species.

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    Art (ART)

  • ART-111, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Art Appreciation

    This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media.

  • ART-114, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Art History Survey I

    This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development.

  • ART-115, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Art History Survey II

    This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development.

  • ART-121, Lab: 6, Credits: 3
    Two-Dimensional Design

    This course introduces the elements and principles of design as applied to two-dimensional art. Emphasis is placed on the structural elements, the principles of visual organization, and the theories of color mixing and interaction. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and use critical and analytical approaches as they apply to two-dimensional visual art.

  • ART-260, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Photography Appreciation

    This course introduces the origins and historical development of photography. Emphasis is placed on the study of composition and history of photography as an art form. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and produce, using color transparencies, properly exposed, well-composed photographs.

  • ART-261, Lab: 6, Credits: 3
    Photography I

    This course introduces photographic equipment, theory, and processes. Emphasis is placed on camera operation, composition, darkroom technique, and creative expression. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, develop, and print a well-conceived composition.

  • ART-264, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Digital Photography I

    This course introduces digital photographic equipment, theory and processes. Emphasis is placed on camera operation, composition, computer photo manipulation and creative expression. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, digitally manipulate, and print a well-conceived composition.

  • ART-265, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Digital Photography II

    This course provides exploration of the concepts and processes of photo manipulation through complex composite images, special effects, color balancing and image/text integration. Emphasis is placed on creating a personal vision and style. Upon completion, students should be able to produce well-executed images using a variety of photographic and photo manipulative approaches.

  • ART-266, Lab: 6, Credits: 3
    Videography I

    This course introduces various aspects of basic video production including concept development, scripting, camera operation, and post-production. Emphasis is placed on creative expression, camera handling, story boarding, and editing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of video camera operation and production techniques.

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    Automation & Robotics (ATR)

  • ATR-211, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Robot Programming

    TThis course provides the operational characteristics of robots and programming in their respective languages. Topics include robot programming, teach pendants, PLC integration, operator interfaces, the interaction of external sensors, machine vision, network systems, and other related devices. Upon completion, students should be able to program and demonstrate the operation of various robots.

  • ATR-214, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Advanced PLCs

    This course introduces the study of high-level programming languages and advanced I/O modules. Topics include advanced programming languages; system networking; computer interfacing; analog and other intelligent I/O modules; and system troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to write and troubleshoot systems using high-level languages and complex I/O modules.

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    Alternative Transportation Technology (ATT)

  • ATT-115, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Green Trans Safety and Service

    This course covers workplace safety, hazardous material and environmental regulation relevant to electric, hybrid and alternative fueled vehicles. Topics include safety of high voltage vehicle systems, gaseous fuel systems and alternative liquid fuels. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate safe work practices, utilize appropriate shop tools and explain government regulations associated with alternative transportation.

  • ATT-125, Lecture: 2, Lab: 4, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Hybrid-Electric Transportation

    This course covers the theory and operation of hybrid-electric drive vehicles. Topics include maintenance, diagnostics, repair and safety procedures for electrically propelled and hybrid vehicles. Upon completion, students should be able to perform diagnostics, maintenance and repair hybrid-electric drive vehicles.

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    Automotive Body Repair (AUB)

  • AUB-111, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Painting & Refinishing I

    This course introduces the proper procedures for using automotive refinishing equipment and materials in surface preparation and application. Topics include federal, state, and local regulations, personal safety, refinishing equipment and materials, surface preparation, masking, application techniques, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and use proper equipment and materials in refinishing following accepted industry standards.

  • AUB-112, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Painting & Refinishing II

    This course covers advanced painting techniques and technologies with an emphasis on identifying problems encountered by the refinishing technician. Topics include materials application, color matching, correction of refinishing problems, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to perform spot, panel, and overall refinishing repairs and identify and correct refinish problems.

  • AUB-114, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Special Finishes

    This course introduces multistage finishes, custom painting, and protective coatings. Topics include base coats, advanced intermediate coats, clear coats, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and apply specialized finishes based on accepted industry standards.

  • AUB-121, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Non-Structural Damage I

    This course introduces safety, tools, and the basic fundamentals of body repair. Topics include shop safety, damage analysis, tools and equipment, repair techniques, materials selection, materials usage, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and repair minor direct and indirect damage including removal/repairing/replacing of body panels to accepted standards.

  • AUB-122, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Non-Structural Damage II

    This course covers safety, tools, and advanced body repair. Topics include shop safety, damage analysis, tools and equipment, advanced repair techniques, materials selection, materials usage, movable glass, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and repair or replace direct and indirect damage to accepted standards including movable glass and hardware.

  • AUB-131, Lecture: 2, Lab: 4, Credits: 4
    Structural Damage I

    This course introduces safety, equipment, structural damage analysis, and damage repairs. Topics include shop safety, design and construction, structural analysis and measurement, equipment, structural glass, repair techniques, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and perform repairs to a vehicle which has received light/moderate structural damage.

  • AUB-132, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Structural Damage II

    This course provides an in-depth study of structural damage analysis and repairs to vehicles that have received moderate to heavy structural damage. Topics include shop safety, structural analysis and measurement, equipment, structural glass, advanced repair techniques, structural component replacement and alignment, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and perform repairs according to industry standards.

  • AUB-136, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Plastics & Adhesives

    This course covers safety, plastic and adhesive identification, and the various repair methods of automotive plastic components. Topics include safety, identification, preparation, material selection, and the various repair procedures including refinishing. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, remove, repair, and/or replace automotive plastic components in accordance with industry standards.

  • AUB-141, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Mechanical & Electrical Components I

    This course covers the basic principles of automotive mechanical and electrical components. Topics include personal and environmental safety and suspension and steering, electrical, brake, heating and air-conditioning, cooling, drive train, and restraint systems. Upon completion, students should be able to identify system components and perform basic system diagnostic checks and/or repairs according to industry standards.

  • AUB-150, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Automotive Detailing

    This course covers the methods and procedures used in automotive detailing facilities. Topics include safety, engine, interior and trunk compartment detailing, buffing/polishing exterior surfaces, and cleaning and reconditioning exterior trim, fabrics, and surfaces. Upon completion, students should be able to improve the overall appearance of a vehicle.

  • AUB-160, Lecture: 1, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Body Shop Operations

    This course introduces the day-to-day operations of autobody repair facilities. Topics include work habits and ethics, customer relations, equipment types, materials cost and control, policies and procedures, shop safety and liabilities, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the general operating policies and procedures associated with an autobody repair facility.

  • AUB-162, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Autobody Estimating

    This course provides a comprehensive study of autobody estimating. Topics include collision damage analysis, industry regulations, flat-rate and estimated time, and collision estimating manuals. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and interpret a damage report.

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    Automotive (AUT)

  • AUT-114, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Safety and Emissions

    This course covers the laws, procedures, and specifications needed to perform a North Carolina State Safety and Emissions inspection. Topics include brake, steering and suspension, lighting, horn, windshield wiper, tire, mirrors, and emission control devices inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to perform complete and thorough North Carolina State Safety and Emissions inspections.

  • AUT-114A, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Safety and Emissions Lab

    This course is an optional lab that allows students to enhance their understanding of North Carolina State Emissions Inspection failures. Topics include evaporative, positive crankcase ventilation, exhaust gas recirculation and exhaust emissions systems operation, including catalytic converter failure diagnosis. Upon completion, students should be able to employ diagnostic strategies to repair vehicle emissions failures resulting from North Carolina State Emissions inspection.

  • AUT-116, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Engine Repair

    This course covers the theory, construction, inspection, diagnosis, and repair of internal combustion engines and related systems. Topics include fundamental operating principles of engines and diagnosis, inspection, adjustment, and repair of automotive engines using appropriate service information. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic diagnosis, measurement and repair of automotive engines using appropriate tools, equipment, procedures, and service information.

  • AUT-141, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Suspension & Steering Systems

    This course covers principles of operation, types, and diagnosis/repair of suspension and steering systems to include steering geometry. Topics include manual and power steering systems and standard and electronically controlled suspension and steering systems. Upon completion, students should be able to service and repair steering and suspension components, check and adjust alignment angles, repair tires, and balance wheels.

  • AUT-151, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Brake Systems

    This course covers principles of operation and types, diagnosis, service, and repair of brake systems. Topics include drum and disc brakes involving hydraulic, vacuum boost, hydra-boost, electrically powered boost, and anti-lock and parking brake systems. Upon completion, students should be able to diagnose, service, and repair various automotive braking systems.

  • AUT-181, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Engine Performance 1

    This course covers the introduction, theory of operation, and basic diagnostic procedures required to restore engine performance to vehicles equipped with complex engine control systems. Topics include an overview of engine operation, ignition components and systems, fuel delivery, injection components and systems and emission control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to describe operation and diagnose/repair basic ignition, fuel and emission related driveability problems using appropriate test equipment/service information.

  • AUT-221, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Automatic Transmissions/Transaxles

    This course covers operation, diagnosis, service, and repair of automatic transmissions/transaxles. Topics include hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, and electrical/electronic operation of automatic drive trains and the use of appropriate service tools and equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to explain operational theory, diagnose and repair automatic drive trains.

  • AUT-231, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Manual Transmissions/Transaxles/Drive Trains

    This course covers the operation, diagnosis, and repair of manual transmissions/transaxles, clutches, driveshafts, axles, and final drives. Topics include theory of torque, power flow, and manual drive train servicing and repair using appropriate service information, tools, and equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to explain operational theory, diagnose and repair manual drive trains.

  • AUT-281, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Advanced Engine Performance

    This course utilizes service information and specialized test equipment to diagnose and repair power train control systems. Topics include computerized ignition, fuel and emission systems, related diagnostic tools and equipment, data communication networks, and service information. Upon completion, students should be able to perform diagnosis and repair.

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    Biology (BIO)

  • BIO-094, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Concepts of Human Biology

    This course focuses on fundamental concepts of human biology. Topics include terminology, biochemistry, cell biology, tissues, body systems, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate preparedness for college-level anatomy and physiology courses.

  • BIO-111, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    General Biology I

    This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels.

  • BIO-112, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    General Biology II

    This course is a continuation of BIO 111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels.

  • BIO-120, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Introductory Botany

    This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of plants. Topics include reproduction and development of seed and non-seed plants, levels of organization, form and function of systems, and a survey of major taxa. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of plant form and function, including selected taxa of both seed and non-seed plants.

  • BIO-130, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Introductory Zoology

    This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is placed on levels of organization, reproduction and development, comparative systems, and a survey of selected phyla. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and function including comparative systems of selected groups.

  • BIO-140, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Environmental Biology

    This course introduces environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. Topics include ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and a focus on current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues.

  • BIO-140A, Lab: 3, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Environmental Biology Lab

    This course provides a laboratory component to complement BIO 140. Emphasis is placed on laboratory and field experience. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a practical understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues.

  • BIO-150, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Genetics in Human Affairs

    This course describes the importance of genetics in everyday life. Topics include the role of genetics in human development, birth defects, cancer and chemical exposure, and current issues including genetic engineering and fertilization methods. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the relationship of genetics to society today and its possible influence on our future.

  • BIO-160, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Introductory Life Science

    This course introduces scientific and biological concepts. Topics include basic chemistry, cell structure and function, cell division, basic genetic concepts, anatomical terminology, and metric-English measurements and conversions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic chemistry, cell biology, genetic concepts; anatomical terminology; and metric-English measurements and conversions.

  • BIO-163, Lecture: 4, Lab: 2, Credits: 5
    Basic Anatomy & Physiology

    This course provides a basic study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a basic study of the body systems as well as an introduction to homeostasis, cells, tissues, nutrition, acid-base balance, and electrolytes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships.

  • BIO-168, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Anatomy and Physiology I

    This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, cytology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and special senses. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships.

  • BIO-169, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Summer 2014
    Anatomy and Physiology II

    This course provides a continuation of the comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as metabolism, nutrition, acid-base balance, and fluid and electrolyte balance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships.

  • BIO-175, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    General Microbiology

    This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis on microorganisms and human disease. Topics include an overview of microbiology and aspects of medical microbiology, identification and control of pathogens, disease transmission, host resistance, and immunity. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of microorganisms and the disease process as well as aseptic and sterile techniques.

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    Blueprint Reading (BPR)

  • BPR-111, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Print Reading

    This course introduces the basic principles of print reading. Topics include line types, orthographic projections, dimensioning methods, and notes. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret basic prints and visualize the features of a part or system.

  • BPR-121, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Blueprint Reading-Mechanical

    This course covers the interpretation of intermediate blueprints. Topics include tolerancing, auxiliary views, sectional views, and assembly drawings. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret a mechanical working drawing.

  • BPR-130, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Print Reading-Construction

    This course covers the interpretation of prints and specifications that are associated with design and construction projects. Topics include interpretation of documents for foundations, floor plans, elevations, and related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret construction prints and documents.

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    Business (BUS)

  • BUS-110, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Introduction to Business

    This course provides a survey of the business world. Topics include the basic principles and practices of contemporary business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of business concepts as a foundation for studying other business subjects.

  • BUS-115, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Business Law I

    This course introduces the ethics and legal framework of business. Emphasis is placed on contracts, negotiable instruments, Uniform Commercial Code, and the working of the court systems. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision-making situations.

  • BUS-125, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Personal Finance

    This course provides a study of individual and family financial decisions. Emphasis is placed on building useful skills in buying, managing finances, increasing resources, and coping with current economic conditions. Upon completion, students should be able to develop a personal financial plan.

  • BUS-137, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Principles of Management

    This course is designed to be an overview of the major functions of management. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, controlling, directing, and communicating. Upon completion, students should be able to work as contributing members of a team utilizing these functions of management.

  • BUS-153, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Human Resource Management

    This course introduces the functions of personnel/human resource management within an organization. Topics include equal opportunity and the legal environment, recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, employee development, compensation planning, and employee relations. Upon completion, students should be able to anticipate and resolve human resource concerns.

  • BUS-260, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Business Communication

    This course is designed to develop skills in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on business reports, correspondence, and professional presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively in the work place.

  • BUS-270, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Professional Development

    This course provides basic knowledge of self-improvement techniques as related to success in the professional world. Topics include positive human relations, job-seeking skills, and projecting positive self-image. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competent personal and professional skills necessary to get and keep a job.

  • BUS-280, Lecture: 4, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    REAL Small Business

    This course introduces hands-on techniques and procedures for planning and opening a small business, including the personal qualities needed for entrepreneurship. Emphasis is placed on market research, finance, time management, and day-to-day activities of owning/operating a small business. Upon completion, students should be able to write and implement a viable business plan and seek funding.

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    Cyber Crime Technology (CCT)

  • CCT-110, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Introduction to Cyber Crime

    This course introduces and explains the various types of offenses that qualify as cyber crime activity. Emphasis is placed on identifying cyber crime activity and the response to these problems from both the private and public domains. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately describe and define cyber crime activities and select an appropriate response to deal with the problem.

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    Chemistry (CHM)

  • CHM-090, Lecture: 4, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Chemistry Concepts

    This course provides a non-laboratory based introduction to basic concepts of chemistry. Topics include measurements, matter, energy, atomic theory, bonding, molecular structure, nomenclature, balancing equations, stoichiometry, solutions, acids and bases, gases, and basic organic chemistry. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and apply basic chemical concepts necessary for success in college-level science courses.

  • CHM-132, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Organic and Biochemistry

    This course provides a survey of major functional classes of compounds in organic and biochemistry. Topics include structure, properties, and reactions of the major organic and biological molecules and basic principles of metabolism. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts needed to pursue studies in related professional fields.

  • CHM-151, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    General Chemistry I

    This course covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM 152.

  • CHM-152, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    General Chemistry II

    This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields.

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    Computer Information Systems (CIS)

  • CIS-110, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Introduction to Computers

    This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems.

  • CIS-115, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Intro to Programming & Logic

    This course introduces computer programming and problem solving in a structured program logic environment. Topics include language syntax, data types, program organization, problem solving methods, algorithm design, and logic control structures. Upon completion, students should be able to manage files with operating system commands, use top-down algorithm design, and implement algorithmic solutions in a programming language.

  • CIS-165, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Desktop Publishing I

    This course provides an introduction to desktop publishing software capabilities. Emphasis is placed on efficient use of a page layout software package to create, design, and print publications; hardware/software compatibility; and integration of specialized peripherals. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare publications given design specifications.

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    Criminal Justice (CJC)

  • CJC-111, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Criminal Justice

    This course introduces the components and processes of the criminal justice system. Topics include history, structure, functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system and their relationship to life in our society. Upon completion, students should be able to define and describe the major system components and their interrelationships and evaluate career options.

  • CJC-112, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Criminology

    This course introduces deviant behavior as it relates to criminal activity. Topics include theories of crime causation; statistical analysis of criminal behavior; past, present, and future social control initiatives; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and discuss various theories of crime causation and societal response.

  • CJC-113, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Juvenile Justice

    This course covers the juvenile justice system and related juvenile issues. Topics include an overview of the juvenile justice system, treatment and prevention programs, special areas and laws unique to juveniles, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify/discuss juvenile court structure/procedures, function and jurisdiction of juvenile agencies, processing/detention of juveniles, and case disposition.

  • CJC-121, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Law Enforcement Operations

    This course introduces fundamental law enforcement operations. Topics include the contemporary evolution of law enforcement operations and related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to explain theories, practices, and issues related to law enforcement operations.

  • CJC-131, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Criminal Law

    This course covers the history/evolution/principles and contemporary applications of criminal law. Topics include sources of substantive law, classification of crimes, parties to crime, elements of crimes, matters of criminal responsibility, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the sources of law and identify, interpret, and apply the appropriate statutes/elements.

  • CJC-132, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Court Procedure & Evidence

    This course covers judicial structure/process/procedure from incident to disposition, kinds and degrees of evidence, and the rules governing admissibility of evidence in court. Topics include consideration of state and federal courts, arrest, search and seizure laws, exclusionary and statutory rules of evidence, and other related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss procedures necessary to establish a lawful arrest/search, proper judicial procedures, and the admissibility of evidence.

  • CJC-141, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Corrections

    This course covers the history, major philosophies, components, and current pracices and problems of the field of corrections. Topics include historical evolution, functions of the various components, alternatives to incarceration, treatment programs, inmate control, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the various components, processes, and functions of the correctional system.

  • CJC-160, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Terrorism: Underlying Issues

    This course identifies the fundamental reasons why America is a target for terrorists, covering various domestic/international terrorist groups and ideologies from a historical aspect. Emphasis is placed upon recognition of terrorist crime scene; weapons of mass destruction; chemical, biological, and nuclear terrorism; and planning considerations involving threat assessments. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss the methods used in terrorists' activities and complete a threat assessment for terrorists' incidents.

  • CJC-212, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Ethics & Community Relations

    This course covers ethical considerations and accepted standards applicable to criminal justice organizations and professionals. Topics include ethical systems; social change, values, and norms; cultural diversity; citizen involvement in criminal justice issues; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical considerations to the decision-making process in identifiable criminal justice situations.

  • CJC-213, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Substance Abuse

    This course is a study of substance abuse in our society. Topics include the history and classifications of drug abuse and the social, physical, and psychological impact of drug abuse. Upon completion, students should be able to identify various types of drugs, their effects on human behavior and society, and treatment modalities.

  • CJC-214, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Victimology

    This course introduces the study of victims. Emphasis is placed on roles/characteristics of victims, victim interaction with the criminal justice system and society, current victim assistance programs, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss and identify victims, the uniqueness of victims' roles, and current victim assistance programs.

  • CJC-215, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Organization & Administration

    This course introduces the components and functions of organization and administration as it applies to the agencies of the criminal justice system. Topics include operations/functions of organizations; recruiting, training, and retention of personnel; funding and budgeting; communications; span of control and discretion; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss the basic components and functions of a criminal justice organization and its administrative operations.

  • CJC-221, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Investigative Principles

    This course introduces the theories and fundamentals of the investigative process. Topics include crime scene/incident processing, information gathering techniques, collection/preservation of evidence, preparation of appropriate reports, court presentations, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, explain, and demonstrate the techniques of the investigative process, report preparation, and courtroom presentation.

  • CJC-222, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Criminalistics

    This course covers the functions of the forensic laboratory and its relationship to successful criminal investigations and prosecutions. Topics include advanced crime scene processing, investigative techniques, current forensic technologies, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and collect relevant evidence at simulated crime scenes and request appropriate laboratory analysis of submitted evidence.

  • CJC-231, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Constitutional Law

    The course covers the impact of the Constitution of the United States and its amendments on the criminal justice system. Topics include the structure of the Constitution and its amendments, court decisions pertinent to contemporary criminal justice issues, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify/discuss the basic structure of the United States Constitution and the rights/procedures as interpreted by the courts.

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    Construction Management (CMT)

  • CMT-120, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Codes and Inspections

    This course covers building codes and the code inspections process used in the design and construction of residential and commercial buildings. Emphasis is placed on commercial, residential, and accessibility (ADA) building codes. Upon completion, students should understand the building code inspections process and apply building code principals and requirements to construction projects.

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    Communication (COM)

  • COM-120, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Intro to Interpersonal Communication

    This course introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication in both dyadic and group settings. Emphasis is placed on the communication process, perception, listening, self-disclosure, speech apprehension, ethics, nonverbal communication, conflict, power, and dysfunctional communication relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate interpersonal communication skills, apply basic principles of group discussion, and manage conflict in interpersonal communication situations.

  • COM-140, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Introduction to Intercultural Communication

    This course introduces techniques of cultural research, definitions, functions, characteristics, and impacts of cultural differences in public address. Emphasis is placed on how diverse backgrounds influence the communication act and how cultural perceptions and experiences determine how one sends and receives messages. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles and skills needed to become effective in communicating outside one's primary culture.

  • COM-231, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Public Speaking

    This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support.

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    Cosmetology (COS)

  • COS-111, Lecture: 4, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Cosmetology Concepts I

    This course introduces basic cosmetology concepts. Topics include safety, first aid, sanitation, bacteriology, anatomy, diseases and disorders, hygiene, product knowledge, chemistry, ethics, manicures, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently apply cosmetology concepts in the salon setting.

  • COS-112, Lab: 24, Credits: 8
    Fall 2014
    Salon I

    This course introduces basic salon services. Topics include scalp treatments, shampooing, rinsing, hair color, design, haircutting, permanent waving, pressing, relaxing, wigs, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently demonstrate salon services.

  • COS-113, Lecture: 4, Credits: 4
    Cosmetology Concepts II

    This course covers more comprehensive cosmetology concepts. Topics include safety, product knowledge, chemistry, manicuring, chemical restructuring, and hair coloring. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently apply these cosmetology concepts in the salon setting.

  • COS-114, Lab: 24, Credits: 8
    Salon II

    This course provides experience in a simulated salon setting. Topics include basic skin care, manicuring, nail application, scalp treatments, shampooing, rinsing, hair color, design, haircutting, chemical restructuring, pressing, wigs, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently demonstrate these salon services.

  • COS-115, Lecture: 4, Credits: 4
    Summer 2014
    Cosmetology Concepts III

    This course covers more comprehensive cosmetology concepts. Topics include safety, product knowledge, salon management, salesmanship, skin care, electricity/light therapy, wigs, thermal hair styling, lash and brow tinting, superfluous hair removal, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently apply these cosmetology concepts in the salon setting.

  • COS-116, Lab: 12, Credits: 4
    Summer 2014
    Salon III

    This course provides comprehensive experience in a simulated salon setting. Emphasis is placed on intermediate-level of skin care, manicuring, scalp treatments, shampooing, hair color, design, haircutting, chemical restructuring, pressing, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently demonstrate these salon services.

  • COS-117, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Cosmetology Concepts IV

    This course covers advanced cosmetology concepts. Topics include chemistry and hair structure, advanced cutting and design, and an overview of all cosmetology concepts in preparation for the licensing examination. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of these cosmetology concepts and meet program completion requirements.

  • COS-118, Lab: 21, Credits: 7
    Fall 2014
    Salon IV

    This course provides advanced experience in a simulated salon setting. Emphasis is placed on efficient and competent delivery of all salon services in preparation for the licensing examination and employment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in program requirements and the areas covered on the Cosmetology Licensing Examination and meet entry-level employment requirements.

  • COS-121, Lecture: 4, Lab: 6, Credits: 6
    Fall 2014
    Manicure/Nail Technology I

    This course covers techniques of nail technology, hand and arm massage, and recognition of nail diseases and disorders. Topics include OSHA/safety, sanitation, bacteriology, product knowledge, salesmanship, manicures, artificial applications, pedicures, massage, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently perform nail care, including manicures, pedicures, massage, decorating, and artificial applications in a salon setting.

  • COS-222, Lecture: 4, Lab: 6, Credits: 6
    Manicure/Nail Tech. II

    This course covers advanced techniques of nail technology and hand and arm massage. Topics include OSHA/safety, product knowledge, customer service, salesmanship, artificial applications, nail art, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence necessary for the licensing examination, including advanced nail care, artificial enhancements, and decorations.

  • COS-223, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Contemp Hair Coloring

    This course covers basic color concepts, hair coloring problems, and application techniques. Topics include color theory, terminology, contemporary techniques, product knowledge, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify a clients color needs and safely and competently perform color applications and correct problems.

  • COS-240, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Summer 2014
    Contemporary Design

    This course covers methods and techniques for contemporary designs. Emphasis is placed on contemporary designs and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate and apply techniques associated with contemporary design.

  • COS-251, Lecture: 8, Credits: 8
    Manicure Instructional Concepts

    This course introduces manicuring instructional concepts. Topics include orientation, theories of education, unit planning, daily lesson planning, laboratory management, student assessment, record keeping, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify theories of education, develop lesson plans, demonstrate supervision techniques, and assess student classroom performance.

  • COS-252, Lab: 15, Credits: 5
    Manicure Instructional Practicum

    This course covers supervisory and instructional skills for teaching manicuring students in a laboratory setting. Topics include demonstrations of services, supervision, student assessment, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the areas covered by the Manicuring Instructor Licensing Examination and meet program completion requirements.

  • COS-260, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Design Applications

    This course provides an overview of the design concepts used in cosmetology. Topics include the application of art principles and elements to artistically design hair, nails, and make-up and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and techniques associated with design concepts.

  • COS-271, Lecture: 5, Credits: 5
    Fall 2014
    Instructor Concepts I

    This course introduces the basic cosmetology instructional concepts. Topics include orientation, theories of education, unit planning, daily lesson planning, laboratory management, student assessment, record keeping, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify theories of education, develop lesson plans, demonstrate supervisory techniques, and assess student performance in a classroom setting.

  • COS-272, Lab: 21, Credits: 7
    Fall 2014
    Instructor Practicum I

    This course covers supervisory and instructional skills for teaching entry-level cosmetology students in a laboratory setting. Topics include demonstrations of services, supervision, and entry-level student assessment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate salon services and instruct and objectively assess the entry-level student.

  • COS-273, Lecture: 5, Credits: 5
    Instructor Concepts II

    This course covers advanced cosmetology instructional concepts. Topics include practical demonstrations, lesson planning, lecture techniques, development and administration of assessment tools, record keeping, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to develop lesson plans, demonstrate supervision techniques, assess student performance in a classroom setting, and keep accurate records.

  • COS-274, Lab: 21, Credits: 7
    Instructor Practicum II

    This course is designed to develop supervisory and instructional skills for teaching advanced cosmetology students in a laboratory setting. Topics include practical demonstrations, supervision, and advanced student assessment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the areas covered by the Instructor Licensing Examination and meet program completion requirements.

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    Computer Science (CSC)

  • CSC-134, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    C++ Programming

    This course introduces computer programming using the C++ programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level.

  • CSC-139, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Visual BASIC Programming

    This course introduces computer programming using the Visual BASIC programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level.

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    Construction (CST)

  • CST-111, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Construction I

    This course covers standard and alternative building methods to include wall framing. Topics include safety and footings, foundations, floor framing systems, and wall framing systems commonly used in the construction industry. Upon completion, students should be able to safely erect all framing necessary to begin roof framing.

  • CST-112, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Construction II

    This course covers building methods and materials used to dry-in a building. Topics include safety, ceiling/roof framing applications, roof finishes, windows, and exterior doors. Upon completion, students should be able to safely erect different roof types and properly install windows and exterior doors, roofing, and exterior finish materials.

  • CST-113, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Construction III

    This course covers building methods and materials used to complete the interior of a structure. Topics include safety, installation of thermal and acoustical barriers, and interior finishes including millwork, cabinets, interior doors, flooring, and wall treatments. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and accurately install interior treatments including insulation, paneling, drywall, molding, doors, flooring, and cabinetry.

  • CST-131, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    OSHA/Safety/Certification

    This course covers the concepts of work site safety. Topics include OSHA regulations, tool safety, and certifications which relate to the construction industry. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and maintain a safe working environment based on OSHA regulations and maintain proper records and certifications.

  • CST-211, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Construction Surveying

    This course covers field surveying applications for residential and commercial construction. Topics include building layout and leveling, linear measurement and turning angles, plumbing vertical members, and topographic and utilities surveys. Upon completion, students should be able to properly and accurately use surveying equipment to lay out residential and commercial buildings.

  • CST-221, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Statics/Structures

    This course covers the principles of statics and strength of materials as applied to structural building components. Topics include forces on columns, beams, girders, and footings and connection points when timber, steel, and concrete members are used. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately analyze load conditions present in structural members.

  • CST-231, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Soils & Site Work

    This course covers site conditions and soil types and their physical properties. Topics include site preparation, access, mechanical analysis, classification of soils, and hydrostatics of groundwater. Upon completion, students should be able to adequately prepare a building site according to plans and specifications.

  • CST-241, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Planning/Estimating I

    This course covers the procedures involved in planning and estimating a construction/building project. Topics include performing quantity take-offs of materials necessary for a building project. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately complete a take-off of materials and equipment needs involved in a construction project.

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    Computer Information Technology (CTS)

  • CTS-120, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Hardware/Software Support

    This course covers the basic hardware of a personal computer, including installation, operations and interactions with software. Topics include component identification, memory-system, peripheral installation and configuration, preventive maintenance, hardware diagnostics/repair, installation and optimization of system software, commercial programs, system configuration, and device-drivers. Upon completion, students should be able to select appropriate computer equipment and software, upgrade/maintain existing equipment and software, and troubleshoot/repair non-functioning personal computers.

  • CTS-130, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Spreadsheet

    This course introduces basic spreadsheet design and development. Topics include writing formulas, using functions, enhancing spreadsheets, creating charts, and printing. Upon completion, students should be able to design and print basic spreadsheets and charts.

  • CTS-285, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Systems Analysis & Design

    This course introduces established and evolving methodologies for the analysis, design, and development of an information system. Emphasis is placed on system characteristics, managing projects, prototyping, CASE/OOM tools, and systems development life cycle phases. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze a problem and design an appropriate solution using a combination of tools and techniques.

  • CTS-289, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    System Support Project

    This course provides an opportunity to complete a significant support project with minimal instructor assistance. Emphasis is placed on written and oral communication skills, project definition, documentation, installation, testing, presentation, and user training. Upon completion, students should be able to complete a project from the definition phase through implementation.

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    Database Management Technology (DBA)

  • DBA-110, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Database Concepts

    This course introduces database design and creation using a DBMS product. Emphasis is placed on data dictionaries, normalization, data integrity, data modeling, and creation of simple tables, queries, reports, and forms. Upon completion, students should be able to design and implement normalized database structures by creating simple database tables, queries, reports, and forms.

  • DBA-120, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Database Programming I

    This course is designed to develop SQL programming proficiency. Emphasis is placed on data definition, data manipulation, and data control statements as well as on report generation. Upon completion, students should be able to write programs which create, update, and produce reports.

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    Drafting (DFT)

  • DFT-151, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    CAD I

    This course introduces CAD software as a drawing tool. Topics include drawing, editing, file management, and plotting. Upon completion, students should be able to produce and plot a CAD drawing.

  • DFT-152, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    CAD II

    This course introduces extended CAD applications. Emphasis is placed upon intermediate applications of CAD skills. Upon completion, students should be able to use extended CAD applications to generate and manage drawings.

  • DFT-154, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Intro to Solid Modeling

    This course is an introduction to basic three-dimensional solid modeling and design software. Topics include basic design, creation, editing, rendering and analysis of solid models, and creation of multiview drawings. Upon completion, students should be able to use design techniques to create, edit, render and generate a multiview drawing.

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    Developmental Mathematics (DMA)

  • DMA-010, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Operations With Integers

    This course provides a conceptual study of integers and integer operations. Topics include integers, absolute value, exponents, square roots, perimeter and area of basic geometric figures, Pythagorean theorem, and use of the correct order of operations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of pertinent concepts and principles and apply this knowledge in the evaluation of expressions.

  • DMA-020, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Fractions and Decimals

    This course provides a conceptual study of the relationship between fractions and decimals and covers related problems. Topics include application of operations and solving contextual application problems, including determining the circumference and area of circles with the concept of pi. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the connections between fractions and decimals.

  • DMA-030, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Proportion/Ratios/Rates/Percents

    This course provides a conceptual study of the problems that are represented by rates, ratios, percent, and proportions. Topics include rates, ratios, percent, proportion, conversion of English and metric units, and applications of the geometry of similar triangles. Upon completion, students should be able to use their understanding to solve conceptual application problems.

  • DMA-040, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Expressions, Linear Equations, Linear Inequalities

    This course provides a conceptual study of problems involving linear expressions, equations, and inequalities. Emphasis is placed on solving contextual application problems. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between simplifying expressions and solving equations and apply this knowledge to problems involving linear expressions, equations, and inequalities.

  • DMA-050, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Graphs and Equations of Lines

    This course provides a conceptual study of problems involving graphic and algebraic representations of lines. Topics include slope, equations of lines, interpretation of basic graphs, and linear modeling. Upon completion, students should be able to solve contextual application problems and represent real-world situations as linear equations in two variables.

  • DMA-060, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Polynomials and Quadratic Applications

    This course provides a conceptual study of problems involving graphic and algebraic representations of quadratics. Topics include basic polynomial operations, factoring polynomials, and solving polynomial equations by means of factoring. Upon completion, students should be able to find algebraic solutions to contextual problems with quadratic applications.

  • DMA-070, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Rational Expressions and Equations

    This course provides a conceptual study of problems involving graphic and algebraic representations of rational equations. Topics include simplifying and performing operations with rational expressions and equations, understanding the domain, and determining the reasonableness of an answer. Upon completion, students should be able to find algebraic solutions to contextual problems with rational applications.

  • DMA-080, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Radical Expressions and Equations

    This course provides a conceptual study of the manipulation of radicals and the application of radical equations to real-world problems. Topics include simplifying and performing operations with radical expressions and rational exponents, solving equations, and determining the reasonableness of an answer. Upon completion, students should be able to find algebraic solutions to contextual problems with radical applications.

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    Drama/Theatre (DRA)

  • DRA-111, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Theatre Appreciation

    This course provides a study of the art, craft, and business of the theatre. Emphasis is placed on the audience's appreciation of the work of the playwright, director, actor, designer, producer, and critic. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a vocabulary of theatre terms and to recognize the contributions of various theatre artists.

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    Developmental Reading & English (DRE)

  • DRE-096, Lecture: 2, Lab: 1, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Integrated Reading and Writing I

    This course is designed to develop proficiency in specific integrated and contextualized reading and writing skills and strategies. Topics include reading and writing processes, critical thinking strategies, and recognition and composition of well-developed, coherent, and unified texts; these topics are primarily taught at the introductory level using texts primarily in a Lexile (TM) range of 960 to 1115. Upon completion, students should be able to apply those skills toward understanding a variety of academic and career-related texts and composing effective paragraphs. Please note: (TM) stands for registered trademark.

  • DRE-097, Lecture: 2, Lab: 1, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Integrated Reading and Writing II

    This course is designed to develop proficiency in integrated and contextualized reading and writing skills and strategies. Topics include reading and writing processes, critical thinking strategies, and recognition and composition of well-developed, coherent, and unified texts; except where noted, these topics are taught at a reinforcement level using texts primarily in a Lexile (TM) range of 1070 to 1220. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate and apply those skills toward understanding a variety of complex academic and career texts and composing essays incorporating relevant, valid evidence. Please note: (TM) represents registered trademark.

  • DRE-098, Lecture: 2, Lab: 1, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Integrated Reading and Writing III

    This course is designed to develop proficiency in integrated and contextualized reading and writing skills and strategies. Topics include reading and writing processes, critical thinking strategies, and recognition and composition of well-developed, coherent, and unified texts; these topics are taught using texts primarily in the Lexile (TM) range of 1185 to 1385. Upon completion, students should be able to apply those skills toward understanding a variety of texts at the career and college ready level and toward composing a documented essay. Note: (TM) represents registered trademark.

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    Electronic Commerce (ECM)

  • ECM-210, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Introduction to E-Commerce

    This course introduces the concepts and tools to implement electronic commerce via the Internet. Topics include application and server software selection, securing transactions, use and verification of credit cards, publishing of catalogs, and site administration. Upon completion, students should be able to setup a working e-commerce Internet web site.

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    Economics (ECO)

  • ECO-251, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Principles of Microeconomics

    This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives.

  • ECO-252, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Principles of Macroeconomics

    This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals.

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    Education (EDU)

  • EDU-119, Lecture: 4, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Introduction to Early Childhood Education

    This course covers the foundations of the education profession, the diverse educational settings for young children, professionalism and planning developmentally appropriate programs for all children. Topics include historical foundations, program types, career options, professionalism and creating inclusive environments and curriculum responsive to the needs of all children and families. Upon completion, students should be able to design career plans and develop schedules, environments and activity plans appropriate for all children.

  • EDU-131, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Child, Family, and Community

    This course covers the development of partnerships between culturally and linguistically diverse families, children, schools and communities. Emphasis is placed on developing skills and identifying benefits for establishing, supporting, and maintaining respectful, collaborative relationships between diverse families, programs/schools, and community agencies/resources. Upon completion, students should be able to explain appropriate relationships between families, educators, and professionals that enhance development and educational experiences of all children.

  • EDU-144, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Child Development I

    This course includes the theories of child development, needs, milestones, and factors that influence development, from conception through approximately 36 months. Emphasis is placed on developmental sequences in physical/motor, emotional/social, cognitive, and language domains and the impact of multiple influences on development and learning. Upon completion, students should be able to compare/contrast typical/atypical developmental characteristics, explain environmental factors that impact development, and identify strategies for enhancing development.

  • EDU-145, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Child Development II

    This course includes the theories of child development, needs, milestones, and factors that influence development, from preschool through middle childhood. Emphasis is placed on developmental sequences in physical/motor, emotional/social, cognitive, and language domains and the impact of multiple influences on development and learning. Upon completion, students should be able to compare/contrast typical/atypical developmental characteristics, explain environmental factors that impact development, and identify strategies for enhancing development.

  • EDU-146, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Child Guidance

    This course introduces principles and practical techniques including the design of learning environments for providing developmentally appropriate guidance for all children, including those at risk. Emphasis is placed on observation skills, cultural influences, underlying causes of behavior, appropriate expectations, development of self control and the role of communication and guidance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate direct/indirect strategies for preventing problem behaviors, teaching appropriate/acceptable behaviors, negotiation, setting limits and recognizing at risk behaviors.

  • EDU-151, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Creative Activities

    This course covers planning, creation and adaptation of developmentally supportive learning environments with attention to curriculum, interactions, teaching practices and learning materials. Emphasis is placed on creating and adapting integrated, meaningful, challenging and engaging developmentally supportive learning experiences in art, music, movement and dramatics for all children. Upon completion, students should be able to create, adapt, implement and evaluate developmentally supportive learning materials, experiences and environments.

  • EDU-153, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Health, Safety and Nutrition

    This course covers promoting and maintaining the health and well-being of all children. Topics include health and nutritional guidelines, common childhood illnesses, maintaining safe and healthy learning environments, recognition and reporting of abuse and neglect and state regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of health, safety, and nutritional needs, safe learning environments, and adhere to state regulations.

  • EDU-163, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Classroom Management and Instruction

    This course covers management and instructional techniques with school-age populations. Topics include classroom management and organization, teaching strategies, individual student differences and learning styles, and developmentally appropriate classroom guidance techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize developmentally appropriate behavior management and instructional strategies that enhance the teaching/learning process and promote students' academic success.

  • EDU-173, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Becoming a Professional in Early Childhood Education

    This course is an introduction to the early childhood profession. Emphasis is placed on the NAEYC Ethical Code, professional growth through involvement in professional organizations, and development of a professional portfolio. Upon completion, students should be able to identify professional resources and community partners in order to involve oneself in the early childhood field.

  • EDU-221, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Children With Exceptionalities

    This course introduces children with exceptionalities, their families, support services, inclusive/diverse settings, and educational/family plans based on the foundations of child development. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of exceptionalities, observation and assessment of children, strategies for adapting the learning environment, and identification of community resources. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize diverse abilities, describe the referral process, and depict collaboration with families/professionals to plan/implement, and promote best practice.

  • EDU-222, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Learners with Behavior Disorders

    This course provides a comprehensive study of learners with behavioral disorders encompassing characteristics, assessments, placement alternatives, inclusion and family interventions. Topics include legislation, appropriate management interventions, and placement options for children with behavior disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, develop, and utilize positive behavior support systems.

  • EDU-223, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Specific Learning Disabilities

    This course provides a comprehensive study of characteristics, alternative assessments, teaching strategies, placement options, inclusion, and family intervention for children with specific learning disabilities. Topics include causes, assessment instruments, learning strategies, and collaborative/inclusion methods for children with specific learning disabilities. Upon completion, students should be able to assist in identifying, assessing, and providing educational interventions for children with specific learning disabilities and their families.

  • EDU-234, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Infants, Toddlers, & Twos

    This course covers the unique needs and rapid changes that occur in the first three years of life and the inter-related factors that influence development. Emphasis is placed on recognizing and supporting developmental milestones through purposeful strategies, responsive care routines and identifying elements of quality, inclusive early care and education. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate respectful relationships that provide a foundation for healthy infant/toddler/twos development, plan/select activities/materials, and partner with diverse families.

  • EDU-235, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    School-Age Development and Programs

    This course includes developmentally appropriate practices in group settings for school-age children. Emphasis is placed on principles of development, environmental planning, and positive guidance techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss developmental principles for all children ages five to twelve and plan and implement developmentally-appropriate activities.

  • EDU-247, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Sensory and Physical Disabilities

    This course covers characteristics, intervention strategies, assistive technologies, and inclusive practices for children with sensory and physical disabilities. Topics include inclusive placement options, utilization of support services, other health impairments and family involvement for children with sensory and physical disabilities. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and utilize intervention strategies and service delivery options for those specific disabilities.

  • EDU-248, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Developmental Delays

    This course covers the causes and assessment of developmental delays and individualized instruction and curriculum for children with developmental delays. Emphasis is placed on definition, characteristics, assessment, educational strategies, inclusion, family involvement, and services for children with developmental delays. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, assess, and plan educational intervention strategies for children with developmental delays and their families.

  • EDU-251, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Exploration Activities

    This course covers discovery experiences in science, math, and social studies. Emphasis is placed on developing concepts for each area and encouraging young children to explore, discover, and construct concepts. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the discovery approach to teaching, explain major concepts in each area, and plan appropriate experiences for children.

  • EDU-254, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Music and Movement for Children

    This course covers the use of music and creative movement for children. Topics include a general survey of the basic elements of music and planning, designing, and implementing music and movement experiences for creative learning. Upon completion, students should be able to use voice and various musical instruments to provide musical and movement activities for children.

  • EDU-259, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Curriculum Planning

    This course is designed to focus on curriculum planning for three to five year olds. Topics include philosophy, curriculum models, indoor and outdoor environments, scheduling, authentic assessment, and planning developmentally appropriate experiences. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate children's development, critique curriculum, plan for individual and group needs, and assess and create quality environments.

  • EDU-261, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Early Childhood Administration I

    This course introduces principles of basic programming and staffing, budgeting/financial management and marketing, and rules and regulations of diverse early childhood programs. Topics include program structure and philosophy, standards of NC child care programs, finance, funding resources, and staff and organizational management. Upon completion, students should be able to develop components of program/personnel handbooks, a program budget, and demonstrate knowledge of fundamental marketing strategies and NC standards.

  • EDU-262, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Early Childhood Administration II

    This course focuses on advocacy/leadership, public relations/community outreach and program quality/evaluation for diverse early childhood programs. Topics include program evaluation/accreditation, involvement in early childhood professional organizations, leadership/mentoring, family, volunteer and community involvement and early childhood advocacy. Upon completion, students should be able to define and evaluate all components of early childhood programs, develop strategies for advocacy and integrate community into programs.

  • EDU-271, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Educational Technology

    This course introduces the use of technology to enhance teaching and learning in all educational settings. Topics include technology concepts, instructional strategies, materials and adaptive technology for children with exceptionalities, facilitation of assessment/evaluation, and ethical issues surrounding the use of technology. Upon completion, students should be able to apply technology enhanced instructional strategies, use a variety of technology resources and demonstrate appropriate technology skills in educational environments.

  • EDU-280, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Language and Literacy Experiences

    This course is designed to expand students' understanding of children's language and literacy development and provides strategies for enhancing language/literacy experiences in an enriched environment. Topics include selection of diverse literature and interactive media, the integration of literacy concepts throughout the curriculum, appropriate observations/assessments and inclusive practices. Upon completion, students should be able to select, plan, implement and evaluate developmentally appropriate and diverse language/literacy experiences.

  • EDU-284, Lecture: 1, Lab: 9, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Early Childhood Capstone Practicum

    This course is designed to allow students to apply skills in a three star (minimum) or NAEYC accredited or equivalent, quality early childhood environment. Emphasis is placed on designing, implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate activities and environments for all children; supporting/involving families; and modeling reflective and professional practices. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate developmentally appropriate plans/assessments, appropriate guidance techniques and ethical/professional behaviors as indicated by assignments and onsite faculty visits.

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    Electrical (ELC)

  • ELC-112, Lecture: 3, Lab: 6, Credits: 5
    Fall 2014
    DC/AC Electricity

    This course introduces the fundamental concepts of and computations related to DC/AC electricity. Emphasis is placed on DC/AC circuits, components, operation of test equipment; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, verify, and analyze simple DC/AC circuits.

  • ELC-113, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Residential Wiring

    This course introduces the care/usage of tools and materials used in residential electrical installations and the requirements of the National Electrical Code. Topics include NEC, electrical safety, and electrical print reading; planning, layout; and installation of electrical distribution equipment; lighting; overcurrent protection; conductors; branch circuits; and conduits. Upon completion, students should be able to properly install conduits, wiring, and electrical distribution equipment associated with residential electrical installations.

  • ELC-114, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Commercial Wiring

    This course provides instruction in the application of electrical tools, materials, and test equipment associated with commercial electrical installations. Topics include the NEC; safety; electrical blueprints; planning, layout, and installation of equipment and conduits; and wiring devices such as panels and overcurrent devices. Upon completion, students should be able to properly install equipment and conduit associated with commercial electrical installations.

  • ELC-115, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Summer 2014
    Industrial Wiring

    This course covers layout, planning, and installation of wiring systems in industrial facilities. Emphasis is placed on industrial wiring methods and materials. Upon completion, students should be able to install industrial systems and equipment.

  • ELC-117, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Motors and Controls

    This course introduces the fundamental concepts of motors and motor controls. Topics include ladder diagrams, pilot devices, contactors, motor starters, motors, and other control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to properly select, connect, and troubleshoot motors and control circuits.

  • ELC-118, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    National Electrical Code

    This course covers the use of the current National Electrical Code. Topics include the NEC history, wiring methods, overcurrent protection, materials, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to effectively use the NEC.

  • ELC-119, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    NEC Calculations

    This course covers branch circuit, feeder, and service calculations. Emphasis is placed on sections of the National Electrical Code related to calculations. Upon completion, students should be able to use appropriate code sections to size wire, conduit, and overcurrent devices for branch circuits, feeders, and service.

  • ELC-121, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Electrical Estimating

    This course covers the principles involved in estimating electrical projects. Topics include take-offs of materials and equipment, labor, overhead, and profit. Upon completion, students should be able to estimate simple electrical projects.

  • ELC-125, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Diagrams and Schematics

    This course covers the interpretation of electrical diagrams, schematics, and drawings common to electrical applications. Emphasis is placed on reading and interpreting electrical diagrams and schematics. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret electrical diagrams and schematics.

  • ELC-128, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Programmable Logic Controller

    This course introduces the programmable logic controller (PLC) and its associated applications. Topics include ladder logic diagrams, input/output modules, power supplies, surge protection, selection/installation of controllers, and interfacing of controllers with equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to understand basic PLC systems and create simple programs.

  • ELC-131, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Circuit Analysis I

    This course introduces DC and AC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include DC and AC principles, circuit analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment operation, circuit simulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret circuit schematics; design, construct, verify, and analyze DC/AC circuits; and properly use test equipment.

  • ELC-131A, Lab: 3, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Circuit Analysis I Lab

    This course provides laboratory assignments as applied to fundamental principles of DC/AC electricity. Emphasis is placed on measurements and evaluation of electrical components, devices and circuits. Upon completion, the students will gain hands-on experience by measuring voltage, current, and opposition to current flow utilizing various meters and test equipment.

  • ELC-132, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Electrical Drawings

    This course introduces the technical documentation that is typically found or used in the industrial environment. Topics include interpretation of service manuals, freehand sketching, orthographic views and dimensions, and print reading. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret technical documents and prints and use basic drafting skills to prepare usable field drawings.

  • ELC-135, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Electrical Machines

    This course covers magnetic circuits, transformers, DC/AC machines, and the three-phase circuit fundamentals including power factor. Topics include magnetic terms and calculations, transformer calculations based on primary or secondary equivalent circuits, and regulation and efficiency calculations. Upon completion, students should be able to perform regulation and efficiency calculations for DC/AC machine circuits.

  • ELC-215, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Electrical Maintenance

    This course introduces the theory of maintenance and the skills necessary to maintain electrical equipment found in industrial and commercial facilities. Topics include maintenance theory, predictive and preventive maintenance, electrical equipment operation and maintenance, and maintenance documentation. Upon completion, students should be able to perform maintenance on electrical equipment in industrial and commercial facilities.

  • ELC-220, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Photovoltaic System Technology

    This course introduces the concepts, tools, techniques, and materials needed to understand systems that convert solar energy into electricity with photovoltaic (pv) technologies. Topics include site analysis for system integration, building codes, and advances in photovoltaic technology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles of photovoltaic technology and current applications.

  • ELC-221, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Advanced Photovoltaic System Designs

    This course introduces specific elements in photovoltaic (pv) systems technologies including efficiency, modules, inverters, charge controllers, batteries, and system installation. Topics include National Electrical Code (NEC), electrical specifications, photovoltaic system components, array design and power integration requirements that combine to form a unified structure. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of various photovoltaic designs and proper installation of NEC compliant solar electric power systems.

  • ELC-228, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Programmable Logic Controllers Applications

    This course covers programming and applications of programmable logic controllers. Emphasis is placed on programming techniques, networking, specialty I/O modules, and system troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to specify, implement, and maintain complex PLC controlled systems.

  • ELC-229, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Applications Project

    This course provides an individual and/or integrated team approach to a practical project as approved by the instructor. Topics include project selection and planning, implementation and testing, and a final presentation. Upon completion, students should be able to plan and implement an applications-oriented project.

  • ELC-234, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Electrical System Design

    This course introduces the principles of electrical design for commercial and industrial facilities. Topics include services, high and low power distribution, switchboards, panelboards, motor control centers, switchgear, overcurrent protection, and grounding. Upon completion, students should be able to design services, feeders, and branch circuits for typical commercial/industrial applications in accordance with the National Electrical Code.

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    Electronics (ELN)

  • ELN-131, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Analog Electronics I

    This course introduces the characteristics and applications of semiconductor devices and circuits. Emphasis is placed on analysis, selection, biasing, and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot analog circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

  • ELN-133, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Digital Electronics

    This course covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, medium scale integration (MSI) and large scale integration (LSI) circuits, analog to digital (AD) and digital to analog (DA) conversion, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot digital circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

  • ELN-231, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Industrial Controls

    This course introduces the fundamental concepts of control of rotating machinery and associated peripheral devices. Topics include rotating machine theory, ladder logic, electromechanical and solid state relays, motor controls, pilot devices, three-phase power systems, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret schematics and demonstrate an understanding of electromechanical and electronic control of rotating machinery.

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    English (ENG)

  • ENG-111, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Writing and Inquiry

    This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English.

  • ENG-112, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Writing and Research in the Disciplines

    This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and writing strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing information and ideas and incorporating research findings into documented writing and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using documentation appropriate to various disciplines.

  • ENG-114, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Professional Research & Reporting

    This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations.

  • ENG-125, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Creative Writing I

    This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice the art of creative writing. Emphasis is placed on writing, fiction, poetry, and sketches. Upon completion, students should be able to craft and critique their own writing and critique the writing of others.

  • ENG-231, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    American Literature I

    This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

  • ENG-232, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    American Literature II

    This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

  • ENG-233, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Major American Writers

    This course provides an intensive study of the works of several major American authors. Emphasis is placed on American history, culture, and the literary merits. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and evaluate the works studied.

  • ENG-241, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    British Literature I

    This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

  • ENG-242, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    British Literature II

    This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

  • ENG-251, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Western World Literature I

    This course provides a survey of selected European works from the Classical period through the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to selected works.

  • ENG-252, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Western World Literature II

    This course provides a survey of selected European works from the Neoclassical period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to selected works.

  • ENG-272, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Southern Literature

    This course provides an analytical study of the works of several Southern authors. Emphasis is placed on the historical and cultural contexts, themes, aesthetic features of individual works, and biographical backgrounds of the authors. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and discuss selected works.

  • ENG-274, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Literature by Women

    This course provides an analytical study of the works of several women authors. Emphasis is placed on the historical and cultural contexts, themes and aesthetic features of individual works, and biographical backgrounds of the authors. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and discuss selected works.

  • ENG-275, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Science Fiction

    This course covers the relationships between science and literature through analysis of short stories and novels. Emphasis is placed on scientific discoveries that shaped Western culture and our changing view of the universe as reflected in science fiction literature. Upon completion, students should be able to trace major themes and ideas and illustrate relationships between science, world view, and science fiction literature.

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    Emergency Preparedness (EPT)

  • EPT-210, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Response & Recovery

    This course introduces the basic concepts, operational procedures, and authorities involved in response and recovery efforts to major disasters. Topics include federal, state, and local roles and responsibilities in major disaster, response, and recovery work, with an emphasis on governmental coordination. Upon completion, students should be able to implement a disaster response plan and assess the needs of those involved in a major disaster.

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    Entrepreneurship (ETR)

  • ETR-210, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Introduction to Entrepreneurship

    This course provides a survey of the starting and operating of an entrepreneurial venture. Topics include new venture creation, the business plan, economics of the business, determining resource needs and acquiring resources, marketing, technology, leadership skills, and business ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of entrepreneurship concepts and how to use the entrepreneurial mindset to succeed in their careers.

    Each student will demonstrate this understanding via a written operational plan for their business idea.

  • ETR-220, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Innovation and Creativity

    This course provides a study of developing and enhancing individual and organizational creativity and innovation. Topics include that innovation needs to be applied to products, services, and processes to increase competitive advantages and add value to businesses. Upon completion, students should be able to apply innovation and creativity principles in the work place.

  • ETR-230, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Entrepreneur Marketing

    This course covers the techniques to correctly research and define the target market to increase sales for start up businesses or to expand current businesses. Topics include how to target market and meet customers' needs with a limited budget in the early stages of the life of a start up business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how to correctly target market for a start-up business with limited resources.

  • ETR-240, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Funding for Entrepreneurs

    This course provides a focus on the financial issues and needs confronting entrepreneurs attempting to grow their businesses by attracting startup and growth capital. Topics include sources of funding including angel investors, venture capital, IPO's, private placement, banks, suppliers, buyers, partners, and the government. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how to effectively finance a business venture.

  • ETR-270, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Entrepreneurship Issues

    This course introduces current and emerging entrepreneurship issues and opportunities. Topics include franchising, import/export, small business taxes, legal structures, negotiations, contract management, and time management. Upon completion, students should be able to apply a variety of analytical and decision-making requirements to start a new business.

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    Forest Management (FOR)

  • FOR-121, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Dendrology

    This course covers field identification, classifications, uses, and nomenclature of trees. Emphasis is placed on silvics, characteristics, commercial importance, and wildlife benefits of trees. Upon completion, students should be able to identify trees and understand their uses.

  • FOR-123, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Forest Botany

    This course introduces the structures and processes of forest plants. Emphasis is placed on dissection and direct examination of roots, shoots, and leaves. Upon completion, students should be able to identify plant parts and understand their functions.

  • FOR-131, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Forest Measurements

    This course introduces basic land and tree measurement equipment and mapping techniques. Emphasis is placed on developing skills for land, tree, and log measurements. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately use land and tree measurement equipment.

  • FOR-171, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Forest Resources

    This course introduces the relationships within the forest and its various uses. Emphasis is placed on forest history, ecology, protection, management, policies, and practices. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the relationship of the forest and its use to the welfare of mankind.

  • FOR-173, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Soils & Hydrology

    This course covers concepts of soils and water including physical and chemical soil properties. Emphasis is placed on soil sampling, identification, plant-site relationships, water movement, and properties. Upon completion, students should be able to relate soil and water characteristics to forest growth and water quality.

  • FOR-175, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Wildlife and Environmental Studies

    This course provides an overview of wildlife and environmental issues pertaining to the ecological, social, and economic aspects of forestry. Topics include wildlife management, wetland delineation, endangered species detection, protection, landowner rights, liabilities, regulations, and law. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of how wildlife and environmental issues affect forestry in the United States.

  • FOR-212, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Forest Surveying & Aerial Interpretation

    This course covers the basic concepts of plane surveying and aerial photo interpretation. Emphasis is placed on boundary location and acreage determination both on the ground and through aerial photographs. Upon completion, students should be able to confidently use basic surveying equipment and aerial photographs for forest land measurements.

  • FOR-215, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Introduction to GIS/GPS

    This course introduces geographic information systems and global positioning devices. Emphasis is placed on the use of existing hardware and software to create and update computer generated maps. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the uses and limitations of GIS and GPS devices in forestry applications.

  • FOR-225, Lecture: 3, Lab: 3, Credits: 4
    Silvics & Silviculture

    This course covers the establishment, development, care, and harvesting of forest stands. Emphasis is placed on the application of various techniques used to control stand establishment, composition, and growth. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and apply appropriate forest stand improvement techniques.

  • FOR-232, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Forest Mensuration

    This course provides applications of previously covered measurement techniques to the volume estimation and valuation of forest stands. Emphasis is placed on applications of various timber cruising methods. Upon completion, students should be able to determine the size, volume, and quality of forest stands.

  • FOR-240, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Forest Protection

    This course covers the forces that affect the health and vigor of the nation's forests. Emphasis is placed on wildfire management, prescribed burning, entomology, pathology, and forest health. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the major pests which affect the forest and understand and recommend control methods.

  • FOR-241, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Forest Fire Management

    This course covers the nature of wildfire and the uses of prescribed burning in a forest or urban interface setting. Topics include prevention, detection, suppression, causes, and the ecological and economic effects of fire. Upon completion, students should be able to use fire as a management tool and participate in the suppression of wildfire.

  • FOR-271, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Forest Management

    This course is designed as a capstone course for forest management majors to apply skills previously learned. Emphasis is placed on recommendations forest managers make to provide services on forest lands to meet the owners' objectives. Upon completion, students should be able to develop forest management plans for various forest ownerships.

    This is the capstone course for the Forest Management Technology A.A.S. degree program.

  • FOR-275, Lab: 3, Credits: 1
    Natural Resources Issues

    This course provides an opportunity to explore natural resource topics of common interest. Emphasis is placed on special topics and organized field trips to expand student knowledge. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the issues explored.

  • FOR-282, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Forest Recreation

    This course covers the principles and problems involved in the utilization of our natural resources for recreational purposes. Topics include planning, development, and maintenance of trails, campgrounds, waterways, and wilderness areas. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the challenges and demands on our natural resources for recreational purposes.

  • FOR-285, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Logging & Marketing

    This course covers logging systems commonly used in the Southeast. Emphasis is placed on roading, matching equipment to job requirements, safety, legal requirements, and primary manufacturing of forest products. Upon completion, students should be able to supervise a logging operation.

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    Fish and Wildlife (FWL)

  • FWL-124, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Wildlife Botany

    This course introduces the classification, physiology, and morphology of plants as needed in fish and wildlife management. Emphasis is placed on plant structures, reproduction, growth, and the economic and ecological importance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the plant kingdom.

  • FWL-126, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Wildlife Ornithology

    This course includes the biology, classification, recognition, distribution, and management of game and non-game birds. Topics include anatomy, physiology, morphology, ecology, behavior, identification, and taxonomy with emphasis on waterfowl and upland game species. Upon completion, students should be able to identify various avian species and demonstrate a knowledge of their biology, ecology, and management.

  • FWL-142, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Wildlife Management

    This course introduces the principles of wildlife management, including basic concepts, terminology, and techniques important to wildlife managers. Topics include a review of the history of wildlife management, ecological principles, an introduction to wildlife habitat requirements, and population dynamics. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and discuss the life history, management techniques, and habitat requirements of North American species.

  • FWL-212, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Wildlife Policy & Law

    This course covers natural resource policies and laws developed by various governmental agencies. Topics include current political issues involved in resource management and the principles, techniques, and jurisdictional boundaries in the field of wildlife law enforcement. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, describe, and assess the influences of policies and laws on natural resource management.

  • FWL-222, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Wildlife Mammalogy

    This course includes the biology, classification, recognition, distribution, and management of game and non-game mammals. Topics include anatomy, physiology, morphology, ecology, behavior, identification and taxonomy with emphasis on game species. Upon completion, students should be able to identify various mammalian species and demonstrate a knowledge of their biology, ecology, and management.

  • FWL-224, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Ichthyology

    This course introduces fresh and saltwater fish species. Emphasis is placed on identification of fish. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize sport, commercial, and environmentally unique fish species.

  • FWL-232, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Terrestrial Ecology

    This course introduces a wide variety of terrestrial life forms and habitats. Emphasis is placed on the biotic and abiotic factors affecting wildlife species. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the relationships between plants and animals, apply various floral and faunal sampling methods, and understand statistical applications.

  • FWL-234, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Aquatic Ecology

    This course introduces a wide variety of aquatic life forms and habitats. Emphasis is placed on freshwater invertebrates, fish and plants of importance in fishery management, and biological monitoring. Upon completion, students should be able to sight identify key invertebrates and fishes and be familiar with aquatic plants and habitats.

  • FWL-242, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fishery Management

    This course covers the biology and management implications for various species of fish with commercial, sport, and/or ecological value. Emphasis is placed on principles and methods of population management. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the anatomy, physiology, age and growth studies, and management techniques for various fish species.

  • FWL-252, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Wildlife Management Techniques

    This course covers the theory and application of current wildlife management techniques. Emphasis is placed on field techniques which are most commonly used by resource management agencies today. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various wildlife management techniques and safely operate and maintain a variety of equipment.

  • FWL-254, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Habitat Manipulation

    This course is a study and application of management practices beneficial to wildlife. Emphasis is placed on methods for increasing food production, developing water sources, increasing cover requirements, and improving wetlands. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of techniques and methods to manipulate wildlife habitats.

    This is the capstone course for the Fish and Wildlife Technology A.A.S. degree program.

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    Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

  • GIS-111, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to GIS

    This course introduces the hardware and software components of a Geographic Information System and reviews GIS applications. Topics include data structures and basic functions, methods of data capture and sources of data, and the nature and characteristics of spatial data and objects. Upon completion, students should be able to identify GIS hardware components, typical operations, products/applications, and differences between database models and between raster and vector systems.

  • GIS-112, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Introduction to GPS

    This course provides an overview of Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Topics include the theory, implementation, and operations of GPS, as well as alternate data source remote sensing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of GPS.

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    Healthcare Business Informatic (HBI)

  • HBI-110, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Issues and Trends in Healthcare Business Informatics

    This course is a survey of current and emerging technology applications and data standards in the healthcare industry. Topics include the history, implementation, use, management, and impact of information technology in healthcare settings. Upon completion, students should have an understanding of the current trends and issues in healthcare informatics.

  • HBI-113, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Survey of Medical Insurance

    This course is a survey of the healthcare insurance system. Emphasis is placed on the foundation necessary for understanding the healthcare delivery system, terminology and practices of healthcare insurance, and provider reimbursement. Upon completion, students should have an understanding of healthcare insurance and how outcomes are addressed through healthcare informatics.

  • HBI-210, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Introduction to Health Information Networking

    This course introduces health information networking. Emphasis is on security and privacy in healthcare, EHR/EMR implementations, designing, securing, and troubleshooting a network to support a medical group. Upon completion, students should be able to design and support healthcare network implementations.

  • HBI-250, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Data Management and Utilization

    This course covers the management and usage of data in healthcare settings according to current practices in healthcare informatics. Topics include data warehousing, data integrity, data security, data mining, and report generating in healthcare settings. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of using healthcare data to support reporting and decision making in healthcare settings.

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    Heavy Equipment Maintenance (HET)

  • HET-110, Lecture: 3, Lab: 9, Credits: 6
    Diesel Engines

    This course introduces theory, design, terminology, and operating adjustments for diesel engines. Emphasis is laced on safety, theory of operation, inspection, measuring, and rebuilding diesel engines according to factory specifications. Upon completion, students should be able to measure, diagnose problems, and repair diesel engines.

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    History (HIS)

  • HIS-111, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    World Civilizations I

    This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations.

  • HIS-112, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    World Civilizations II

    This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations.

  • HIS-121, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Western Civilization I

    This course introduces western civilization from pre-history to the early modern era. Topics include ancient Greece, Rome, and Christian institutions of the Middle Ages and the emergence of national monarchies in western Europe. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early western civilization.

  • HIS-122, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Western Civilization II

    This course introduces western civilization from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the religious wars, the Industrial Revolution, World Wars I and II, and the Cold War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern western civilization.

  • HIS-131, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    American History I

    This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history.

  • HIS-132, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    American History II

    This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major American wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War.

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    Horticulture (HOR)

  • HOR-116, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Landscape Management I

    This course covers information and skills necessary to analyze a property and develop a management schedule. Emphasis is placed on property measurement, plant condition, analysis of client needs, and plant culture needs. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze a property, develop management schedules, and implement practices based on client needs.

  • HOR-152, Lab: 3, Credits: 1
    Horticultural Practices

    This course covers the maintenance of ornamental plantings and production areas. Topics include maintenance of flower beds, vegetable gardens, greenhouses, and container and field nursery stock using sound horticultural practices. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the principles and practices of maintaining ornamental landscape plantings.

  • HOR-160, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Plant Materials I

    This course covers identification, culture, characteristics, and use of plants in a sustainable landscape. Emphasis is placed on nomenclature, identification, growth requirements, cultural requirements, soil preferences, and landscape applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the proper selection and utilization of plant materials, including natives and invasive plants.

  • HOR-162, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Applied Plant Science

    This course introduces the basic concepts of botany as they apply to horticulture. Topics include nomenclature, physiology, morphology, and anatomy as they apply to plant culture. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the basic principles of botany to horticulture.

  • HOR-164, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Horticultural Pest Management

    This course covers the identification and management of plant pests including insects, diseases, and weeds. Topics include pest identification and beneficial organisms, pesticide application safety and use of least toxic methods of management. Upon completion, students should be able to manage common landscape pests using least toxic methods of control and be prepared to sit for North Carolina Commercial Pesticide Ground Applicators license.

  • HOR-166, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Soils and Fertilizers

    This course covers the physical and chemical properties of soils and soil fertility and management. Topics include soil formation; classification; physical, chemical, and biological properties (including microorganisms); testing; and fertilizer application. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze, evaluate, and properly amend soils/media according to sustainable practices.

  • HOR-168, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Plant Propagation

    This course is a study of sexual and asexual reproduction of plants. Emphasis is placed on seed propagation, grafting, stem and root propagation, micro-propagation, and other propagation techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully propagate ornamental plants.

  • HOR-265, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Advanced Plant Materials

    This course covers important landscape plants. Emphasis is placed on identification, plant nomenclature, growth characteristics, cultural requirements, and landscape uses. Upon completion, studentsshould be able to correctly select plants for specific landscape uses.

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    Humanities (HUM)

  • HUM-110, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Technology and Society

    This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology.

  • HUM-115, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Critical Thinking

    This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts.

  • HUM-120, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Cultural Studies

    This course introduces the distinctive features of a particular culture. Topics include art, history, music, literature, politics, philosophy, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to appreciate the unique character of the study culture.

  • HUM-121, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    The Nature of America

    This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of the American cultural, social, and political experience. Emphasis is placed on the multicultural character of American society, distinctive qualities of various regions, and the American political system. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant cultural, social, and political aspects of American life.

  • HUM-122, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Southern Culture

    This course explores the major qualities that make the South a distinct region. Topics include music, politics, literature, art, religion, race relations, and the role of social class in historical and contemporary contexts. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the characteristics that distinguish Southern culture.

  • HUM-123, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Appalachian Culture

    This course provides an interdisciplinary study of the unique features of Appalachian culture. Topics include historical, political, sociological, psychological, and artistic features which distinguish this region. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a broad-based awareness and appreciation of Appalachian culture.

  • HUM-130, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Myth in Human Culture

    This course provides an in-depth study of myths and legends. Topics include the varied sources of myths and their influence on the individual and society within diverse cultural contexts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a general familiarity with myths and a broad-based understanding of the influence of myths and legends on modern culture.

  • HUM-150, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    American Womens Studies

    This course provides an inter-disciplinary study of the history, literature, and social roles of American women from Colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on women's roles as reflected in American language usage, education, law, the workplace, and mainstream culture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze the roles of women as reflected in various cultural forms.

  • HUM-160, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Film

    This course introduces the fundamental elements of film artistry and production. Topics include film styles, history, and production techniques, as well as the social values reflected in film art. Upon completion, students should be able to critically analyze the elements covered in relation to selected films.

  • HUM-220, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Human Values and Meaning

    This course presents some major dimensions of human experience as reflected in art, music, literature, philosophy, and history. Topics include the search for identity, the quest for knowledge, the need for love, the individual and society, and the meaning of life. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize interdisciplinary connections and distinguish between open and closed questions and between narrative and scientific models of understanding.

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    Hydraulics (HYD)

  • HYD-110, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Hydraulics/Pneumatics I

    This course introduces the basic components and functions of hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Topics include standard symbols, pumps, control valves, control assemblies, actuators, FRL, maintenance procedures, and switching and control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the operation of a fluid power system, including design, application, and troubleshooting.

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    Industrial Science (ISC)

  • ISC-112, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Industrial Safety

    This course introduces the principles of industrial safety. Emphasis is placed on industrial safety and OSHA regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a safe working environment and OSHA compliance.

  • ISC-220, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Lean Manufacturing

    This course introduces students to the concept of lean manufacturing as a means of waste reduction. Topics include the examination of manufacturing operations and the incorporation of lean techniques to reduce waste, cost, time, and materials in manufacturing processes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of lean manufacturing systems and how they benefit the environment and business.

  • ISC-271, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Sampling & Reliability

    This course introduces sampling and sampling plans. Emphasis is placed on mil standards, OC curves, and data gathering and problem-solving tools. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare a sampling plan and use problem-solving tools such as cause-and-effect diagrams.

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    Machining (MAC)

  • MAC-111, Lecture: 2, Lab: 12, Credits: 6
    Fall 2014
    Machining Technology I

    This course introduces machining operations as they relate to the metalworking industry. Topics include machine shop safety, measuring tools, lathes, drilling machines, saws, milling machines, bench grinders, and layout instruments. Upon completion, students should be able to safely perform the basic operations of measuring, layout, drilling, sawing, turning, and milling.

  • MAC-112, Lecture: 2, Lab: 12, Credits: 6
    Fall 2014
    Machining Technology II

    This course provides additional instruction and practice in the use of precision measuring tools, lathes, milling machines, and grinders. Emphasis is placed on setup and operation of machine tools including the selection and use of work holding devices, speeds, feeds, cutting tools, and coolants. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic procedures on precision grinders and advanced operations of measuring, layout, drilling, sawing, turning, and milling.

  • MAC-113, Lecture: 2, Lab: 12, Credits: 6
    Fall 2014
    Machining Technology III

    This course provides an introduction to advanced and special machining operations. Emphasis is placed on working to specified tolerances with special and advanced setups. Upon completion, students should be able to produce a part to specifications.

  • MAC-114, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Metrology

    This course introduces the care and use of precision measuring instruments. Emphasis is placed on the inspection of machine parts and use of a wide variety of measuring instruments. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the correct use of measuring instruments.

  • MAC-115, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Grinding Operations

    This course introduces surface and cylindrical grinding in the toolroom. Topics include safety and the basic setup and operation of surface and cylindrical grinding machines. Upon completion, students should be able to grind steps, slots, angles, radii, dress grinding wheels, and square blocks.

  • MAC-121, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Introduction to CNC

    This course introduces the concepts and capabilities of computer numerical control machine tools. Topics include setup, operation, and basic applications. Upon completion, students should be able to explain operator safety, machine protection, data input, program preparation, and program storage.

  • MAC-122, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    CNC Turning

    This course introduces the programming, setup, and operation of CNC turning centers. Topics include programming formats, control functions, program editing, part production, and inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts using CNC turning centers.

  • MAC-124, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    CNC Milling

    This course introduces the manual programming, setup, and operation of CNC machining centers. Topics include programming formats, control functions, program editing, part production, and inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts using CNC machining centers.

  • MAC-142, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Machining Applications II

    This course provides instruction in the wide variety of processes associated with machining. Topics include safety, equipment set-up, holding fixtures, tooling, cutting speeds and depths, metal properties, and proper finishes. Upon completion, students should be able to safely demonstrate advanced machining operations, accurately measure components, and produce accurate components with a proper finish.

  • MAC-151, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Machining Calculations

    This course introduces basic calculations as they relate to machining occupations. Emphasis is placed on basic calculations and their applications in the machine shop. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic shop calculations.

  • MAC-214, Lecture: 2, Lab: 12, Credits: 6
    Fall 2014
    Machining Technology IV

    This course provides advanced applications and practical experience in the manufacturing of complex parts. Emphasis is placed on inspection, gaging, and the utilization of machine tools. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture complex assemblies to specifications.

  • MAC-222, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Advanced CNC Turning

    This course covers advanced methods in setup and operation of CNC turning centers. Emphasis is placed on programming and production of complex parts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in programming, operations, and setup of CNC turning centers.

  • MAC-224, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Advanced CNC Milling

    This course covers advanced methods in setup and operation of CNC machining centers. Emphasis is placed on programming and production of complex parts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in programming, operations, and setup of CNC machining centers.

  • MAC-226, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    CNC EDM Machining

    This course introduces the programming, setup, and operation of CNC electrical discharge machines. Topics include programming formats, control functions, program editing, production of parts, and inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts using CNC electrical discharge machines.

  • MAC-229, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    CNC Programming

    This course provides concentrated study in advanced programming techniques for working with modern CNC machine tools. Topics include custom macros and subroutines, canned cycles, and automatic machining cycles currently employed by the machine tool industry. Upon completion, students should be able to program advanced CNC functions while conserving machine memory.

  • MAC-234, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Advanced Multi-Axis MacHining

    This course includes multi-axis machining using machining centers with multi-axis capabilities. Emphasis is placed on generation of machining center input with a CAM system and setup of pallet changer and rotary system for multi-axis machining fixtures. Upon completion, students should be able to convert CAD to output for multi-axis machining centers, including tooling, setup, and debugging processes.

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    Masonry (MAS)

  • MAS-140, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Masonry

    This course introduces basic principles and practices of masonry. Topics include standard tools, materials, and practices used in basic masonry and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of masonry and be able to use basic masonry techniques.

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    Mathematics (MAT)

  • MAT-101, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Applied Mathematics I

    This course is a comprehensive review of arithmetic with basic algebra designed to meet the needs of certificate and diploma programs. Topics include arithmetic and geometric skills used in measurement, ratio and proportion, exponents and roots, applications of percent, linear equations, formulas, and statistics. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems in their specific areas of study.

  • MAT-115, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Mathematical Models

    This course develops the ability to utilize mathematical skills and technology to solve problems at a level found in non-mathematics-intensive programs. Topics include applications to percent, ratio and proportion, formulas, statistics, function notation, linear functions, probability, sampling techniques, scatter plots, and modeling. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems, reason and communicate with mathematics, and work confidently, collaboratively, and independently.

  • MAT-120, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Geometry and Trigonometry

    This course introduces the concepts of plane trigonometry and geometry with emphasis on applications to problem solving. Topics include the basic definitions and properties of plane and solid geometry, area and volume, right triangle trigonometry, and oblique triangles. Upon completion, students should be able to solve applied problems both independently and collaboratively using technology.

  • MAT-121, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Algebra/Trigonometry I

    This course provides an integrated approach to technology and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret mathematical functions and formulas used in problem solving. Topics include the properties of plane and solid geometry, area and volume, and basic proportion applications; simplification, evaluation, and solving of algebraic equations and inequalities and radical functions; complex numbers; right triangle trigonometry; and systems of equations. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results.

  • MAT-143, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Quantitative Literacy

    This course is designed to engage students in complex and realistic situations involving the mathematical phenomena of quantity, change and relationship, and uncertainty through project- and activity-based assessment. Emphasis is placed on authentic contexts which will introduce the concepts of numeracy, proportional reasoning, dimensional analysis, rates of growth, personal finance, consumer statistics, practical probabilities, and mathematics for citizenship. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize quantitative information as consumers and to make personal, professional, and civic decisions by decoding, interpreting, using, and communicating quantitative information found in modern media and encountered in everyday life.

  • MAT-152, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Statistical Methods I

    This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students should be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results.

  • MAT-171, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Precalculus Algebra

    This course is designed to develop topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology.

  • MAT-171A, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Summer 2014
    Precalculus Algebra Lab

    This course is a laboratory for MAT 171. Emphasis is placed on experiences that enhance the materials presented in the class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and communicate effectively.

  • MAT-172, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Precalculus Trigonometry

    This course is designed to develop an understanding of topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangles, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology.

  • MAT-271, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Calculus I

    This course is designed to develop the topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology.

  • MAT-272, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Calculus II

    This course is designed to develop advanced topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology.

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    Mechanical (MEC)

  • MEC-142, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Physical Metallurgy

    This course covers the heat treating of metals. Emphasis is placed on the effects of hardening, tempering, and annealing on the structure and physical properties of metals. Upon completion, students should be able to heat treat materials.

  • MEC-231, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Computer-Aided Manufacturing I

    This course introduces computer-aided design/ manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications and concepts. Topics include software, programming, data transfer and verification, and equipment setup. Upon completion, students should be able to produce parts using CAD/CAM applications.

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    Medical Assisting (MED)

  • MED-110, Lecture: 1, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Orientation to Medical Assisting

    This course covers the history of medicine and the role of the medical assistant in the health care setting. Emphasis is placed on professionalism, communication, attitude, behaviors, and duties in the medical environment. Upon completion, students should be able to project a positive attitude and promote the profession of medical assisting.

  • MED-114, Lecture: 1, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Professional Interaction in Health Care

    This course is designed to identify various patient behaviors encountered in the medical setting. Emphasis is placed on stressors related to illness, cultural influences, death and dying, and needs specific to patients. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize appropriate methods of verbal and nonverbal communication with empathy and impartiality.

  • MED-116, Lecture: 3, Lab: 2, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Anatomy & Physiology

    This course introduces basic anatomy and physiology. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between body structure and function and the procedures common to health care. Upon completion, students should be able to identify body system components and functions relating this knowledge to the delivery of health care.

  • MED-118, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Summer 2014
    Medical Law and Ethics

    This course covers legal relationships of physicians and patients, contractual agreements, professional liability, malpractice, medical practice acts, informed consent, and bioethical issues. Emphasis is placed on legal terms, professional attitudes, and the principles and basic concepts of ethics and laws involved in providing medical services. Upon completion, students should be able to meet the legal and ethical responsibilities of a multi-skilled health professional.

  • MED-121, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Medical Terminology I

    This course introduces prefixes, suffixes, and word roots used in the language of medicine. Topics include medical vocabulary and the terms that relate to the anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, and treatment of selected systems. Upon completion, students should be able to pronounce, spell, and define medical terms as related to selected body systems and their pathological disorders.

  • MED-122, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Medical Terminology II

    This course is the second in a series of medical terminology courses. Topics include medical vocabulary and the terms that relate to the anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, and treatment of selected systems. Upon completion, students should be able to pronounce, spell, and define medical terms as related to selected body systems and their pathological disorders.

  • MED-130, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Administrative Office Procedures I

    This course introduces medical office administrative procedures. Topics include appointment processing, written and oral communications, medical records, patient orientation, and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic administrative skills within the medical environment.

  • MED-131, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Administrative Office Procedures II

    This course provides medical office procedures in both economic and management skills. Topics include physical plant maintenance, equipment and supplies, liability coverage, medical economics, and introductory insurance procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to manage the economics of the medical office and supervise personnel.

  • MED-140, Lecture: 3, Lab: 4, Credits: 5
    Summer 2014
    Examining Room Procedures I

    This course provides instruction in clinical examining room procedures. Topics include asepsis, infection control, assisting with exams and treatment, patient education, preparation and administration of medications, EKG, vital signs, and medical emergencies. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in exam room procedures.

  • MED-150, Lecture: 3, Lab: 4, Credits: 5
    Fall 2014
    Laboratory Procedures I

    This course provides instruction in basic lab techniques used by the medical assistant. Topics include lab safety, quality control, collecting and processing specimens, performing selective tests, phlebotomy, screening and follow-up of test results, and OSHA/CLIA regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic lab tests/skills based on course topics.

  • MED-240, Lecture: 3, Lab: 4, Credits: 5
    Fall 2014
    Examining Room Procedures II

    This course is designed to expand and build upon skills presented in MED 140. Emphasis is placed on advanced exam room procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate enhanced competence in selected exam room procedures.

  • MED-260, Clinic: 15, Credits: 5
    MED Clinical Practicum

    This course provides the opportunity to apply clinical, laboratory, and administrative skills in a medical facility. Emphasis is placed on enhancing competence in clinical and administrative skills necessary for comprehensive patient care and strengthening professional communications and interactions. Upon completion, students should be able to function as an entry-level health care professional.

  • MED-264, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Medical Assisting Overview

    This course provides an overview of the complete medical assisting curriculum. Emphasis is placed on all facets of medical assisting pertinent to administrative, laboratory, and clinical procedures performed in the medical environment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the areas covered on the national certification examination for medical assistants.

  • MED-272, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Drug Therapy

    This course focuses on major drug groups, including their side effects, interactions, methods of administration, and proper documentation. Emphasis is placed on the theory of drug administration. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, spell, recognize side effects of, and document the most commonly used medications in a physician's office.

  • MED-274, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Diet Therapy/Nutrition

    This course introduces the basic principles of nutrition as they relate to health and disease. Topics include basic nutrients, physiology, dietary deficiencies, weight management, and therapeutic nutrition in wellness and disease. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret clinical and dietary data and provide patient counseling and education.

  • MED-276, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Patient Education

    This course is designed to provide communication skills, basic education principles, and knowledge of available community resources and to apply this knowledge to the clinical setting. Emphasis is placed on identifying appropriate community resources, developing patient education materials, and perfecting written and oral communication skills. Upon completion, students should be able to instruct, communicate effectively, and act as a liaison between the patient and community agencies.

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    Marketing and Retailing (MKT)

  • MKT-120, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Principles of Marketing

    This course introduces principles and problems of marketing goods and services. Topics include promotion, placement, and pricing strategies for products. Upon completion, students should be able to apply marketing principles in organizational decision making.

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    Maintenance (MNT)

  • MNT-110, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Maintenance Procedures

    This course covers basic maintenance fundamentals for power transmission equipment. Topics include equipment inspection, lubrication, alignment, and other scheduled maintenance procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of accepted maintenance procedures and practices according to current industry standards.

  • MNT-111, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Maintenance Practices

    This course provides in-depth theory and practical applications relating to predictive and preventive maintenance programs. Emphasis is placed on equipment failure analysis, maintenance management software, and techniques such as vibration and infrared analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of modern analytical and documentation methods.

  • MNT-160, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Industrial Fabrication

    This course covers the necessary techniques to fabricate and assemble basic items common in industrial environments. Emphasis is placed on students being able to create basic items such as frames, guards, supports, and other components commonly used in industry. Upon completion, students should be able to safely fabricate and assemble selected items within specifications.

  • MNT-165, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Mechanical Industrial Systems

    This course covers mechanical components used in industrial machine operations. Emphasis is placed on mechanical drives, belts, gears, couplings, electrical drives, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of industrial machines and be able to maintain this equipment.

  • MNT-220, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Rigging and Moving

    This course covers the principles of safe rigging practices for handling, placing, installing, and moving heavy machinery and equipment. Topics include safety, weight and dimensional estimation, positioning of equipment slings, rollers, jacks, levers, dollies, ropes, chains, padding, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely relocate and set up equipment using accepted rigging practices.

  • MNT-222, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Industrial Systems Schematics

    This course covers the reading and drawing of schematics and diagrams. Emphasis is placed on water and gas plumbing, hydraulic and pneumatic circuits, electrical circuits, and welding diagrams. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret and construct industrial schematics and diagrams.

  • MNT-230, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Pumps & Piping Systems

    This course covers pump installation and maintenance and related valves and piping systems. Topics include various types of pump systems and their associated valves, piping requirements, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to select and install pump and piping systems and demonstrate proper maintenance and troubleshooting procedures.

  • MNT-240, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Indust Equip Troubleshoot

    This course covers the various service procedures, tools, instruments, and equipment necessary to analyze and repair typical industrial equipment. Emphasis is placed on electro-mechanical and fluid power equipment troubleshooting, calibration, and repair, including common techniques and procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to troubleshoot and repair industrial equipment.

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    Music (MUS)

  • MUS-110, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Music Appreciation

    This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music.

  • MUS-112, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Introduction to Jazz

    This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music.

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    Networking Technology (NET)

  • NET-125, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Networking Basics

    This course introduces the networking field. Emphasis is placed on network terminology and protocols, local-area networks, wide-area networks, OSI model, cabling, router programming, Ethernet, IP addressing, and network standards. Upon completion, students should be able to perform tasks related to networking mathematics, terminology, and models, media, Ethernet, subnetting, and TCP/IP Protocols.

  • NET-126, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Routing Basics

    This course focuses on initial router configuration, router software management, routing protocol configuration, TCP/IP, and access control lists (ACLs). Emphasis will be placed on the fundamentals of router configuration, managing router software, routing protocol, and access lists. Upon completion, students should have an understanding of routers and their role in WANs, router configuration, routing protocols, TCP/IP, troubleshooting, and ACLs.

  • NET-225, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Routing & Switching I

    This course focuses on advanced IP addressing techniques, intermediate routing protocols, command-line interface configuration of switches, Ethernet switching, VLANs, STP, and VTP. Emphasis will be placed on application and demonstration of skills acquired in pre-requisite courses. Upon completion, students should be able to perform tasks related to VLSM, routing protocols, switching concepts and configuration, STP, VLANs, and VTP.

  • NET-226, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Routing and Switching II

    This course introduces WAN theory and design, WAN technology, PPP, Frame Relay, ISDN, and additional case studies. Topics include network congestion problems, TCP/IP transport and network layer protocols, advanced routing and switching configuration, ISDN protocols, PPP encapsulation operations on a router. Upon completion, students should be able to provide solutions for network routing problems, identify ISDN protocols, and describe the Spanning Tree protocol.

  • NET-240, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Network Design

    This course covers the principles of the design of LANs and WANs. Topics include network architecture, transmission systems, traffic management, bandwidth requirements, Internet working devices, redundancy, and broad-band versus base-band systems. Upon completion, students should be able to design a network to meet specified business and technical requirements.

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    Network Operating Systems (NOS)

  • NOS-110, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Operating Systems Concepts

    This course introduces students to a broad range of operating system concepts, including installation and maintenance. Emphasis is place on operating system concepts, management, maintenance, and resources required. Upon completion of this course, students will have an understanding of OS concepts, installation, management, maintenance, using a variety of operating systems.

  • NOS-120, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Linux/UNIX Single User

    This course develops the necessary skills for students to develop both GUI and command line skills for using and customizing a Linux workstation. Topics include Linux file system and access permissions, GNOME Interface, VI editor, X Window System expression pattern matching, I/O redirection, network and printing utilities. Upon completion, students should be able to customize and use Linux systems for command line requirements and desktop productivity roles.

  • NOS-130, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Windows Single User

    This course introduces operating system concepts for single-user systems. Topics include hardware management, file and memory management, system configuration/optimization, and utilities. Upon completion, students should be able to perform operating systems functions at the support level in a single-user environment.

  • NOS-220, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Linux/Unix Administration I

    This course introduces the Linux file system, group administration, and system hardware controls. Topics include installation, creation and maintaining file systems, NIS client and DHCP client configuration, NFS, SMB/Samba, Configure X, Gnome, KDE, basic memory, processes, and security. Upon completion, students should be able to perform system administration tasks including installation, configuring and attaching a new Linux workstation to an existing network.

  • NOS-230, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Windows Administration I

    This course covers the installation and configuration of a Windows Server operating system. Emphasis is placed on the basic configuration of core network services, Active Directory and group policies. Upon completion, students should be able to install and configure a Windows Server operating system.

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    Nursing (NUR)

  • NUR-111, Lecture: 4, Lab: 6, Clinic: 6, Credits: 8
    Introduction to Health Concepts

    This course introduces the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts within each domain including medication administration, assessment, nutrition, ethics, interdisciplinary teams, informatics, evidence-based practice, individual-centered care, and quality improvement. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course.

  • NUR-112, Lecture: 3, Clinic: 6, Credits: 5
    Health-Illness Concepts

    This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of acid-base, metabolism, cellular regulation, oxygenation, infection, stress/coping, health-wellness-illness, communication, caring interventions, managing care, safety, quality improvement, and informatics. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course.

  • NUR-113, Lecture: 3, Clinic: 6, Credits: 5
    Family Health Concepts

    This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of oxygenation, sexuality, reproduction, grief/loss, mood/affect, behaviors, development, family, health-wellness-illness, communication, caring interventions, managing care, safety, and advocacy. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course.

  • NUR-114, Lecture: 3, Clinic: 6, Credits: 5
    Holistic Health Concepts

    This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of cellular regulation, perfusion, inflammation, sensory perception, stress/coping, mood/affect, cognition, self, violence, health-wellness-illness, professional behaviors, caring interventions, and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course.

  • NUR-117, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Pharmacology

    This course introduces information concerning sources, effects, legalities, and the safe use of medications as therapeutic agents. Emphasis is placed on nursing responsibility, accountability, pharmocokinetics, routes of medication administration, contraindications and side effects.Upon completion, students should be able to compute dosages and administer medication safely.

  • NUR-211, Lecture: 3, Clinic: 6, Credits: 5
    Health Care Concepts

    This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of cellular regulation, perfusion, infection, immunity, mobility, comfort, behaviors, health-wellness-illness, clinical decision-making, caring interventions, managing care, and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course.

  • NUR-212, Lecture: 3, Clinic: 6, Credits: 5
    Health System Concepts

    This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of grief/loss, violence, health-wellness-illness, collaboration, managing care, safety, advocacy, legal issues, policy, healthcare systems, ethics, accountability, and evidence-based practice. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course

  • NUR-213, Lecture: 4, Lab: 3, Clinic: 15, Credits: 10
    Complex Health Concepts

    This course is designed to assimilate the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of fluid/electrolytes, metabolism, perfusion, mobility, stress/coping, violence, health-wellness-illness, professional behaviors, caring interventions, managing care, healthcare systems, and quality improvement. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide quality, individualized, entry level nursing care.

  • NUR-214, Lecture: 3, Clinic: 3, Credits: 4
    Nsg Transition Concepts

    This course is designed to introduce concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing as the LPN transitions to the ADN role. Emphasis is placed on the concepts within each domain including evidenced-based practice, quality improvement, communication, safety, interdisciplinary team, clinical decision-making, informatics, assessment, caring, and health-wellness-illness. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course.

  • NUR-221, Lecture: 6, Clinic: 9, Credits: 9
    LPN to ADN Concepts I

    This course is designed for the LPN to ADN student to explore the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of safety, perfusion, inflammation, oxygenation, mood/affect, behavior, development, family, health-wellness-illness, sensory perception, stress/coping, cognition, self, violence, and professional behaviors. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course.

  • NUR-223, Lecture: 6, Clinic: 9, Credits: 9
    LPN to ADN Concepts II

    This course is designed for the LPN to ADN student to assimilate the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of fluid/electrolytes, metabolism, thermoregulation, oxygenation, tissue integrity, infection, perfusion, mobility, reproduction, sexuality, health-wellness-illness, professional behaviors, accountability, advocacy, and collaboration. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide quality, individualized, entry-level nursing care.

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    Office Systems Technology (OST)

  • OST-131, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Keyboarding

    This course covers basic keyboarding skills. Emphasis is placed on the touch system, correct techniques, and development of speed and accuracy. Upon completion, students should be able to key at an acceptable speed and accuracy level using the touch system.

  • OST-136, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Word Processing

    This course is designed to introduce word processing concepts and applications. Topics include preparation of a variety of documents and mastery of specialized software functions. Upon completion, students should be able to work effectively in a computerized word processing environment.

  • OST-137, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Office Software Applications

    This course introduces the concepts and functions of software that meets the changing needs of the community. Emphasis is placed on the terminology and use of software through a hands on approach. Upon completion, students should be able to use software in a business environment.

  • OST-148, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Medical Coding Billing & Insurance

    This course introduces fundamentals of medical coding, billing, and insurance. Emphasis is placed on the medical billing cycle to include third party payers, coding concepts, and form preparation. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the life cycle of and accurately complete a medical insurance claim.

  • OST-149, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Medical Legal Issues

    This course introduces the complex legal, moral, and ethical issues involved in providing health-care services. Emphasis is placed on the legal requirements of medical practices; the relationship of physician, patient, and office personnel; professional liabilities; and medical practice liability. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of current medical law and accepted ethical behavior.

  • OST-164, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Text Editing Applications

    This course provides a comprehensive study of editing skills needed in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, proofreading, and editing. Upon completion, students should be able to use reference materials to compose and edit text.

  • OST-181, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Office Systems

    This course introduces the skills and abilities needed in today's office. Topics include effectively interacting with co-workers and the public, processing simple financial and informational documents, and performing functions typical of today's offices. Upon completion, students should be able to display skills and decision-making abilities essential for functioning in the total office context.

  • OST-243, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Med Office Simulation

    This course introduces medical systems used to process information in the automated office. Topics include traditional and electronic information resources, storing and retrieving information, and the billing cycle. Upon completion, students should be able to use the computer accurately to schedule, bill, update, and make corrections.

  • OST-247, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Procedure Coding

    This course provides in-depth coverage of procedural coding. Emphasis is placed on CPT and HCPCS coding systems. Upon completion, students should be able to properly code procedures and services performed in a medical facility.

  • OST-248, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Diagnostic Coding

    This course provides an in-depth study of diagnostic coding. Emphasis is placed on ICD coding system. Upon completion, students should be able to properly code diagnoses in a medical facility.

  • OST-281, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Emer Issues in Med Ofc

    This course provides a comprehensive discussion of topics familiar to the health care setting. Topics include emerging issues in the health care setting. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of current medical office procedures and treatments.

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    Professional Crafts: Clay (PCC)

  • PCC-110, Lecture: 3, Lab: 15, Credits: 8
    Fall 2014
    Intro to Pottery

    This course introduces pottery making for potters, including clay preparation, wheel throwing and trimming, surface decoration, and glazing and firing techniques. Topics include clay bodies and the mixing process, potter's wheel basics, glazing, kiln loading and firing, and safety issues. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare clay; center and throw basic forms; trim, mix, and apply basic glazes; and load and fire bisque kilns.

  • PCC-111, Lecture: 3, Lab: 15, Credits: 8
    Functional Pottery I

    This course covers the important elements of designing and producing utilitarian pottery, including wall thickness, balance and proportion, surface decoration, and glazing and firing techniques. Topics include bowls, mugs, plates, casseroles, stemware, and bottles, with emphasis on safe glazing and supervised firing. Upon completion, students should be able to produce a variety of functional pots, apply a glaze, and load and assist firing a kiln.

  • PCC-112, Lecture: 1, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    History of Pottery

    This course examines the historical development of ceramics and the contributions made by specific cultures or countries. Topics include potters from early societies, including the Mediterranean countries, China, Cyprus, and Crete with emphasis on design, technique, and firing methods. Upon completion, students should be able to identify numerous historical pottery types, discuss the societies which produced them, and demonstrate knowledge of their production methods.

  • PCC-113, Lecture: 1, Credits: 1
    Contemporary Pottery

    This course surveys numerous 19th- and 20th-century potters and artists who have contributed to the contemporary ceramics movement. Topics include artists such as Leach, Cardew, and Hamada and the important design and technical contributions these potters have made to the ceramics movement. Upon completion, students should be able to identify numerous contemporary potters and their work.

  • PCC-114, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Summer 2014
    Raku

    This course introduces clay bodies, glazes, kilns, and firing techniques necessary for making and safely firing raku pottery. Topics include clay properties, glaze types, kiln design, firing techniques, and historical information and safety related to the raku process. Upon completion, students should be able to make, glaze, and fire a variety of raku projects.

  • PCC-116, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Summer 2014
    Pottery Tool Making

    This course covers design concepts and construction techniques for building simple personal studio equipment, including wedging tables, extruders, and kiln furniture. Emphasis is placed on skills and safe use of hand tools, design fundamentals, selection of needed materials, and construction methods. Upon completion, students should be able to identify appropriate projects, select materials and tools, obtain materials, and construct several small and one major project.

  • PCC-117, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Glaze Testing

    This course provides the opportunity to identify and test numerous glazes for a personal glaze inventory. Topics include firing temperature, color, texture, methods of adjustment, and methods of testing on sample tiles. Upon completion, students should be able to select glaze recipes; weigh out test batches; apply glazes to tile; and fire, adjust results, and refire.

  • PCC-118, Lab: 4, Credits: 2
    Clay: Special Study

    This course provides a format in which to explore personal interests in clay with instructor supervision. Emphasis is placed on student proposals and student-instructor-developed contractual agreements specifying goals, deadlines, and evaluation criteria. Upon completion, students should be able to complete clay works as specified in student-instructor-designed contractual agreements.

  • PCC-119, Lab: 4, Credits: 2
    Clay Design: Spec Study

    This course provides a format in which to explore personal interests in clay design with instructor supervision. Emphasis is placed on student proposals and student-instructor-developed contractual agreements specifying goals, deadlines, and evaluation criteria. Upon completion, students should be able to complete clay design projects as specified in student-instructor-designed contractual agreements.

  • PCC-210, Lecture: 3, Lab: 15, Credits: 8
    Fall 2014
    Functional Pottery II

    This course expands previous wheel throwing skills and involves larger, more complicated forms, production skills, slip and glaze theory, kiln theory, and glaze firing. Topics include centering and throwing larger amounts of clay, production techniques, record keeping, studio layout, kiln design, and fuel systems. Upon completion, students should be able to produce pots with competent handles, proper lids, and matching multiple forms and identify kiln properties and burner types.

  • PCC-211, Lecture: 3, Lab: 15, Credits: 8
    Decorative Pottery

    This course continues previous functional skill development, including limited production and one-of-a-kind pieces with emphasis on forming techniques. Topics include multiple cylinder forms, thrown additions, production skills, glaze testing, surface decoration, and firing techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to produce entry-level professional work for show and sale using a variety of forming and finishing techniques.

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    Professional Crafts: Design (PCD)

  • PCD-110, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Intro to Craft Design

    This course introduces the basic principles, elements, vocabulary,and process of two-dimensional design within the context ofprofessionally produced crafts. Emphasis is placed on general designconcepts and vocabulary, conceptual thinking, design processapplication, and observational skills. Upon completion, studentsshould be able to demonstrate enhanced observational skills and aworking knowledge of design vocabulary, concepts, and processes.

  • PCD-111, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Advanced Craft Design

    This course explores the conceptual process of design as applied tothe three-dimensional form. Emphasis is placed on solvingthree-dimensional design problems which are material, function, site,or client specific. Upon completion, students should be able toapply an enhanced understanding of the relationship between designconcept, process, and product in three-dimensional form.

  • PCD-211, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Prof Craft Design

    This course covers the development of customer- or site-influenceddesign and the development and design of craft marketing promotionalmaterials. Topics include customer-guided, site-specific, and otherdesign influences and development and design of logos, hang tags, websites, brochures, and related promotional materials. Uponcompletion, students should be able to design within site, customer,or other limitations and complete a design package for their personalmarketing needs.

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    Professional Crafts: Fiber (PCF)

  • PCF-110, Lecture: 2, Lab: 15, Credits: 7
    Fall 2014
    Intro to Weaving

    This course introduces weaving and the procedures for warping a loom and fiber identification as used in professional weaving. Emphasis is placed on tabby, twills, tapestry, laces, brocades, block theory, pattern drafting, and finishing techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to apply weaving procedures and technical skill to woven samples and some finished objects.

  • PCF-111, Lecture: 2, Lab: 10, Credits: 7
    Intermediate Weaving

    This course covers intermediate elements of weaving and weaving theory including structural design, the use of multi-shafts, and computer drafting. Topics include tied structures such as summer and winter, double weave, overshot, supplementary warp, and loom-controlled laces. Upon completion, students should be able to explore the technical aspects of weaving and fibers through samples and apply that knowledge to finished pieces.

  • PCF-113, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Sewing With Handwovens

    This course introduces basic machine and hand sewing techniques with an emphasis on sewing hand-woven cloth. Topics include seam types, hems, interfacing, and closures applicable to a range of products made with handwoven textiles. Upon completion, students should be able to design and professionally stitch a variety of products including garments, home decor products, and accessories.

  • PCF-120, Lecture: 1, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Color and Pattern Design

    This course covers color theory and pattern specifically for use with fibers. Topics include color systems, value, palette development, color mixing, and repeating pattern as used in professional weaving. Upon completion, students should be able to identify hue, value, color systems, and pattern and demonstrate an understanding of their application to woven pieces;

  • PCF-121, Lecture: 1, Credits: 1
    History of Textiles

    This course is a cultural survey of the major weaving traditions of the world. Topics include weaving traditions of North and South America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize materials, design, and techniques of various cultures and demonstrate an understanding of social implications of the textile craft.

  • PCF-122, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Fiber Dyeing

    This course provides a practical application of dye theory including dye types, methods, and color development. Topics include fiber reactive dyes, acid dyes, vat dyes, pigments, ikat, warp painting, variegated dyeing, and dye sample record keeping. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately apply dye to yarns and reproduce colors using a variety of appropriate methods.

  • PCF-123, Lecture: 2, Lab: 3, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Print Design for Textiles

    This course introduces printing on fabric with an emphasis on continuous surface and repeating pattern. Topics include various stencil-making methods including photo-emulsion silkscreen and CAD, and printing yardage with dyes, pigments and textile paints. Upon completion, students should be able to use production printing methods to design and print repeating patterns on yardage using techniques appropriate to fiber type.

  • PCF-130, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Spinning

    This course introduces spinning yarns using both drop spindles and the spinning wheel. Emphasis is placed on preparation and use of fibers including wool, cotton, flax, and hair in the production of single and plied yarns. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and spin yarns of various fibers.

  • PCF-131, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Shibori

    This course introduces traditional and non-traditional methods of tied, folded, and stitched resists for dyeing on cloth. Emphasis is placed on developing methods of resist and the use of appropriate dyes and fabrics. Upon completion, students should be able to produce a variety of resist dye effects on hand-woven and commercially woven fabric.

  • PCF-132, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Vegetable Dyeing

    This course introduces mordanting and dyeing yarns and fibers with natural plant materials. Emphasis is placed on developing a basic palette of natural dye sources, color variation through mordants, and gathering and processing plant materials. Upon completion, students should be able to obtain a varied palette of color on yarns and fibers using natural plant materials and mordants.

  • PCF-133, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Off-Loom Techniques

    This course introduces off-loom fiber techniques. Topics include card weaving, felting, plaiting, and braiding. Upon completion, students should be able to produce samples of designated applications as well as finished objects.

  • PCF-210, Lecture: 1, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Contemporary Textiles

    This course provides a survey of weaving and textile traditions from 1900 to present, including major technical developments in industry, current trends and critical analysis. Topics include the Arts and Crafts Movement, the Bauhaus, the influence of new fibers on industry, and contemporary fiber art and textile designers. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize the work of contemporary fiber artists and critically analyze their work.

  • PCF-211, Lecture: 2, Lab: 15, Credits: 7
    Fall 2014
    Production Methods for Textiles

    This course provides a format for designing prototypes and/or multiples for professional textile work. Topics include designing for specific price categories, studio organization and record keeping as well as production methods for hand weaving, dyeing, printing and sewing. Upon completion, students should be able to develop prototypes and finished pieces for sale with a plan for production in their own studio.

  • PCF-213, Lecture: 2, Lab: 15, Credits: 7
    Professional Textiles

    This course provides an opportunity for students to design and create an original cohesive body of textile work suitable for public exhibition. Emphasis is placed on development of prototypes, finished work, presentation and portfolio. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and showcase work to galleries and the public in a professional manner.

  • PCF-230, Lab: 4, Credits: 2
    Fiber: Special Study

    This course provides a format in which to explore personal interests in fiber with instructor supervision. Emphasis is placed on student proposals and student-instructor-developed contractual agreements specifying goals, deadlines, and evaluation criteria. Upon completion, students should be able to complete fiber work as specified in student-instructor-developed contractual agreements.

  • PCF-232, Lab: 4, Credits: 2
    Fiber Design: Spec Study

    This course provides a format in which to explore personal fiber design interests with instructor supervision. Emphasis is placed on student proposals and student-instructor-developed contractual agreements specifying goals, deadlines, and evaluation criteria. Upon completion, students should be able to complete fiber design work as specified in the contractual agreements.

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    Professional Crafts: Jewelry (PCJ)

  • PCJ-111, Lecture: 2, Lab: 15, Credits: 7
    Fall 2014
    Intro to Jewelry

    This course introduces jewelry construction for professional jewelry design and production. Topics include fabrication techniques, basic tool usage, mechanisms, finishing techniques, and studio safety. Upon completion, students should be able to safely solder and rivet to construct and finish jewelry and hollowware.

  • PCJ-112, Lecture: 2, Lab: 15, Credits: 7
    Jewelry Forming Tech

    This course introduces forming techniques. Emphasis is placed on developing skills to form jewelry and hollowware by raising, forging, shell forming, die forming, and casting. Upon completion, students should be able to produce objects that utilize forming techniques.

  • PCJ-113, Lecture: 3, Lab: 9, Credits: 6
    Summer 2014
    Jewelry Decorative Tech.

    This course introduces decorative techniques. Emphasis is placed on producing objects incorporating repousse granulation, reticulation, inlay, stone setting, patinas, anodizing, and etching. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate decorative techniques to enhance the surface of jewelry and hollowware.

  • PCJ-121, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Jewelry Design I

    This course introduces two- and three-dimensional jewelry and hollowware design. Emphasis is placed on applying principles, elements, and relationships of design to jewelry and hollowware. Upon completion, students should be able to design jewelry and hollowware and demonstrate visual problem-solving skills.

  • PCJ-122, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Jewelry Design II

    This course introduces rendering jewelry and hollowware. Topics include two-point perspective, shading, and rendering metals and stones. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate visual presentation skills for jewelry and hollowware.

  • PCJ-123, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Summer 2014
    Jewelry Design III

    This course is a continuation of PCJ 122. Emphasis is placed on producing renderings and/or models of original designs of jewelry and hollowware. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate visual presentation skills and apply the principles, elements, and relationships of design.

  • PCJ-214, Lecture: 2, Lab: 15, Credits: 7
    Fall 2014
    Jewelry Production Tech

    This course covers production techniques and development of a production and studio plan. Topics include making and cutting rubber molds, wax injection, multiple spruing, and applying jigs for production. Upon completion, students should be able to develop a production and studio plan and produce multiple jewelry and hollowware.

  • PCJ-215, Lecture: 2, Lab: 15, Credits: 7
    Advanced Jewelry

    This course covers basic jewelry repair and provides an opportunity to develop a body of work for a portfolio or exhibition. Emphasis is placed on prong tipping, ring sizing, and chain repairing and on designing, producing, and presenting objects for a portfolio or exhibition. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate jewelry repair skills and complete a body of work for a portfolio or exhibition.

  • PCJ-241, Lab: 4, Credits: 2
    Jewelry: Special Study

    This course provides a format in which to explore personal interests in jewelry with instructor supervision. Emphasis is placed on student proposals and student-instructor-developed contractual agreements specifying goals, deadlines, and evaluation criteria. Upon completion, students should be able to complete jewelry/hollowware as specified in student-instructor-developed contractual agreements.

  • PCJ-261, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Enameling

    This course introduces materials, equipment, procedures, and health hazards involved in producing enamelware. Emphasis is placed on producing enamelware incorporating limoge, basse taille, and cloisonne techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills needed to safely produce enamelware by preparing the metal and enamel, applying the enamel, firing, and finishing.

  • PCJ-262, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Hand Wrought Metals

    This course covers the fundamental processes, techniques and tools for heating and forging ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Topics include fire control, use of hammers, tools and traditional techniques for metal shapes. Upon completion, students should be able to heat and use a variety of metals to create tools and shape basic metal projects.

  • PCJ-263, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Advanced Wrought Metals

    This course covers ideas and techniques for designing, heating and shaping metal. Topics include hammer control, use of power tools and advanced techniques such as metal lamination. Upon completion, students should be able to use traditional and contemporary techniques to make objects such as buckles, vessels, pendants, and blades.

  • PCJ-264, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Basic Knife Making

    This course introduces fundamental design and technical skills for knife making. Topics include blade processes of forging and stock removal, as well as handle materials and attachment methods. Upon completion, students should be able to select appropriate techniques, materials, and designs to produce a basic functional or decorative knife.

  • PCJ-265, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Advanced Knife Making

    This course expands upon basic skills and knowlede of blade making, handle attachment, and ornamentation. Topics include techniques such as laminated blades, ground blades, advanced handle attachment, and decorative elements (inlay, carving, riveting, and stone setting). Upon completion, students should be able to design and finish more professional quality functional and decorative hand-made knives.

  • PCJ-266, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Jewelry Tool Making

    This course introduces the fundamental design and technical skills for producing tools used in a jewelry studio. Topics include steel selection, tool design, introduction of hardening and tempering processes with emphasis placed on tools for chasing and repousse. Upon completion, students should be able to select proper steel, design and produce tools for decorative techniques used in the jewelry profession.

  • PCJ-267, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Hand Wrought Joinery

    This course introduces the use of traditional joinery techniques used in the Hand Wrought Metal Profession. Emphasis is placed on the history and processes of the traditional joinery using tenons, mortises, collars, rivets, and forge welded joints. Upon completion, students should be able to create joints for hand wrought metal work using mortise and tenon, collars, and hot wraps.

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    Professional Crafts (PCR)

  • PCR-112, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Summer 2014
    20TH-CENTURY Crafts

    This course surveys the origins and influences of American craft from the late 19th century to the present. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between period stylistic trends in craft, the arts, and architecture and larger societal influences. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of design movements and social events of the 20th century and their influence on American craft.

  • PCR-210, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Studio Craft Photo

    This course introduces the concepts and processes of 35mm studio photography for the professional crafter. Topics include the 35mm camera and related equipment, basic studio lighting theory, simple to advanced lighting techniques, composition, print and slide evaluation, and marketing applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the 35mm camera and related equipment, studio lighting, and composition and complete an entry-level portfolio.

  • PCR-212, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Craft Marketing

    This course introduces marketing and business planning as applied to hand crafts and development of a written marketing plan. Emphasis is placed on self-evaluation, goal setting, development of a business idea, presentation skills, professional image, and organizing and writing a marketing plan. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate realistic craft marketing goals, individual presentation skills, and professional image and organize, write, and present a marketing plan.

  • PCR-213, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Craft Enterprise

    This course covers financial information and small business skills needed to develop a written business plan combining a craft marketing plan and studio planning. Topics include business plan analysis, break-even point, cash flow, filing systems, operations, policies, manual and computerized bookkeeping, writing, and presentational skills. Upon completion, students should be able to write a craft business plan, project a cash flow statement, explain break-even point, and establish filing and record systems.

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    Professional Crafts: Wood (PCW)

  • PCW-110, Lecture: 3, Lab: 15, Credits: 8
    Fall 2014
    Intro to Woodworking

    This course introduces the properties of wood, basic machine and tool use and safety, box design and construction, and various furniture joinery for woodworkers. Topics include the technical study of wood, hand woodworking methods of box making, assorted box and framing joinery, and hand finishing methods. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate woodworking joinery, box design and construction techniques, and knowledge of wood properties and their effect on furniture design.

  • PCW-111, Lecture: 3, Lab: 15, Credits: 8
    Framing Joinery/Design

    This course introduces design embellishment techniques and design and construction of various furniture functions through the use of framing structures. Topics include designing and making mirror frames, stools, benches, coffee tables, and dining tables, with emphasis on specialty techniques such as woodbending, veneering, and finishing. Upon completion, students should be able to design and make furniture and accessories utilizing framing construction and specialty design techniques.

  • PCW-112, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Summer 2014
    Production Design

    This course covers the design, construction, and cost analysis of small-scale production items targeting various price points. Topics include basic market research, production, jigs and fixtures, time studies, and the making of various production prototypes such as lamps, cutting boards, and boxes. Upon completion, students should be able to design, make, and cost out production items for various price points.

  • PCW-120, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Drafting for Woodworkers

    This course introduces the concepts, techniques, and tools of freehand and mechanical drawing as applied to furniture design and construction. Emphasis is placed on basic drafting conventions and techniques, freehand drawing skills, orthographic and isometric drawing, conceptual drawing, and working and presentation drawings. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize the design process beginning with an idea and progressing through conceptual, working, and presentation drawings.

  • PCW-121, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Rendering for Woodworkers

    This course introduces the concepts and techniques of graph-generated perspective drawing and basic pencil rendering techniques as applied to furniture design. Emphasis is placed on basic concepts of perspective and freehand perspective drawing, use of various perspective grids, perspective shadowing, and basic pencil rendering techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to produce both freehand and mechanical perspective drawings from the conceptual stage through finished pencil rendering.

  • PCW-122, Lecture: 2, Credits: 2
    Furniture Design History

    This course covers the historical development of furniture design of western civilization from ancient Egyptian society through the twentieth century. Topics include design themes, styles, and furniture functions of major historical periods from King Tut to late twentieth-century independent designer craftsmen. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize sources of historical design themes and contemporary applications of design in woodworking.

  • PCW-130, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Veneer, Marquetry & Inlay

    This course introduces veneering, marquetry, and inlay techniques as means of decorating surfaces in wood design. Emphasis is placed on hands-on experience in veneering, marquetry, and inlay techniques using tools, materials, process, and design applications. Upon completion, students should be able to design and produce a sample of various techniques and develop design applications.

  • PCW-131, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Woodbending

    This course covers various types of woodbending methods used in furniture design. Topics include bent lamination, steam bending, and molded plywood methods with emphasis on mold making, clamping systems, and design applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate mold making, clamping systems, and design applications for laminating, steam bending, and molding plywood.

  • PCW-136, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Wood Finishing

    This course covers wood finishing options with hand, brush, and spray applications, including special finishing effects. Topics include finish compositions, including oils, varnish, lacquer, paints, dyes, and stains, and special techniques such as fuming, bleaching, and pickling. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate various special finishing techniques and skills through samples and completed projects.

  • PCW-210, Lecture: 2, Lab: 15, Credits: 7
    Fall 2014
    Chair Design & Const

    This course covers the design and construction of various seating functions and the associated woodworking technology for chair-making. Topics include design of chair prototypes, testing of structures, advanced woodbending, carving, jigs and fixtures, and coloring methods of finishing. Upon completion, students should be able to design, test, and make a chair and demonstrate various advanced specialty woodworking techniques.

  • PCW-211, Lecture: 2, Lab: 15, Credits: 7
    Casework Design & Const

    This course covers case goods design and construction through an independent project that demonstrates professionalism in a craft business. Topics include the study of various case goods' functions such as dressers, desks, and cabinets and the independent development of a professional quality project. Upon completion, students should be able to design and make a case work piece of furniture and demonstrate professionalism in a project of their choice.

  • PCW-230, Lab: 4, Credits: 2
    Wood Design: Special Study

    This course provides a format in which to explore personal interests in wood design with instructor supervision. Emphasis is placed on student proposals and student-instructor-developed contractual agreements specifying goals, deadlines, and evaluation criteria. Upon completion, students should be able to complete a design project as specified in student-instructor-approved contractual agreement.

  • PCW-231, Lab: 4, Credits: 2
    Wood Business: Spec Study

    This course provides a format in which to explore a woodworking business opportunity with instructor supervision. Emphasis is placed on student proposals and student-instructor-developed contractual agreements specifying goals, deadlines, and evaluation criteria. Upon completion, students should be able to complete woodworking business project as specified in student-instructor-approved contractual agreement.

  • PCW-232, Lab: 4, Credits: 2
    Woodworking: Spec Study

    This course provides a format in which to explore personal interests in woodworking with instructor supervision. Emphasis is placed on student proposals and student-instructor-developed contractual agreements specifying goals, deadlines, and evaluation criteria. Upon completion, students should be able to complete a woodworking project as specified in student-instructor-approved contractual agreement.

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    Physical Education (PED)

  • PED-110, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fit and Well for Life

    This course is designed to investigate and apply the basic concepts and principles of lifetime physical fitness and other health-related factors. Emphasis is placed on wellness through the study of nutrition, weight control, stress management, and consumer facts on exercise and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to plan a personal, lifelong fitness program based on individual needs, abilities, and interests.

  • PED-120, Lab: 3, Credits: 1
    Walking for Fitness

    This course introduces fitness through walking. Emphasis is placed on stretching, conditioning exercises, proper clothing, fluid needs, and injury prevention. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in a recreational walking program.

  • PED-122, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Yoga I

    This course introduces the basic discipline of yoga. Topics include proper breathing, relaxation techniques, and correct body positions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the procedures of yoga.

  • PED-123, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Yoga II

    This course introduces more detailed aspects of the discipline of yoga. Topics include breathing and physical postures, relaxation, and mental concentration. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate advanced procedures of yoga.

  • PED-143, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Volleyball-Beginning

    This course covers the fundamentals of volleyball. Emphasis is placed on the basics of serving, passing, setting, spiking, blocking, and the rules and etiquette of volleyball. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational volleyball.

  • PED-152, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Swimming-Beginning

    This course is designed for non-swimmers and beginners. Emphasis is placed on developing confidence in the water, learning water safety, acquiring skills in floating, and learning elementary strokes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate safety skills and be able to tread water, back float, and use the crawl stroke for 20 yards.

  • PED-153, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Swimming-Intermediate

    This course is designed for those who have mastered basic swimming skills. Emphasis is placed on refining basic skills and learning new swim strokes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the four basic strokes, the scissors kick, the underwater swim, and other related skills.

  • PED-154, Lab: 3, Credits: 1
    Swimming for Fitness

    This course introduces lap swimming, aquacises, water activities, and games. Emphasis is placed on increasing cardiovascular efficiency through aquatic exercise. Upon completion, students should be able to develop an individualized aquatic fitness program.

  • PED-171, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Nature Hiking

    This course provides instruction on how to equip and care for oneself on the trail. Topics include clothing, hygiene, trail ethics, and necessary equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully participate in nature trail hikes.

  • PED-219, Lab: 2, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Disc Golf

    This course introduces the fundamentals of disc golf. Emphasis is placed on basic throwing techniques, putting, distance driving, scoring, and single and doubles play. Upon completion, students should be able to perform the skills required in playing situations.

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    Philosophy (PHI)

  • PHI-210, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    History of Philosophy

    This course introduces fundamental philosophical issues through an historical perspective. Emphasis is placed on such figures as Plato, Aristotle, Lao-Tzu, Confucius, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Kant, Wollstonecraft, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and distinguish among the key positions of the philosophers studied.

  • PHI-215, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Philosophical Issues

    This course introduces fundamental issues in philosophy considering the views of classical and contemporary philosophers. Emphasis is placed on knowledge and belief, appearance and reality, determinism and free will, faith and reason, and justice and inequality. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, analyze, and critically evaluate the philosophical components of an issue.

  • PHI-220, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Western Philosophy I

    This course covers Western intellectual and philosophic thought from the early Greeks through the medievalists. Emphasis is placed on such figures as the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Epictetus, Augustine, Suarez, Anselm, and Aquinas. Upon completion, students should be able to trace the development of leading ideas regarding reality, knowledge, reason, and faith.

  • PHI-221, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Western Philosophy II

    This course covers Western intellectual and philosophic thought from post-medievalists through recent thinkers. Emphasis is placed on such figures as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Mill, and representatives of pragmatism, logical positivism, and existentialism. Upon completion, students should be able to trace the development of leading ideas concerning knowledge, reality, science, society, and the limits of reason.

  • PHI-230, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Introduction to Logic

    This course introduces basic concepts and techniques for distinguishing between good and bad reasoning. Emphasis is placed on deduction, induction, validity, soundness, syllogisms, truth functions, predicate logic, analogical inference, common fallacies, and scientific methods. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze arguments, distinguish between deductive and inductive arguments, test validity, and appraise inductive reasoning.

  • PHI-240, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Introduction to Ethics

    This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on moral theories such as consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to moral issues such as abortion, capital punishment, poverty, war, terrorism, the treatment of animals, and issues arising from new technologies.

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    Political Science (POL)

  • POL-120, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    American Government

    This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy process. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system.

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    Psychology (PSY)

  • PSY-150, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    General Psychology

    This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology.

  • PSY-237, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Social Psychology

    This course introduces the study of individual behavior within social contexts. Topics include affiliation, attitude formation and change, conformity, altruism, aggression, attribution, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of social influences on behavior.

  • PSY-241, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Developmental Psychology

    This course is a study of human growth and development. Emphasis is placed on major theories and perspectives as they relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development from conception to death. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development across the life span.

  • PSY-281, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Abnormal Psychology

    This course provides an examination of the various psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology. Emphasis is placed on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior patterns as well as demonstrate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic techniques.

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    Religion (REL)

  • REL-110, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    World Religions

    This course introduces the world's major religious traditions. Topics include Primal religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, beliefs, and practices of the religions studied.

  • REL-111, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Eastern Religions

    This course introduces the major Asian religious traditions. Topics include Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, beliefs, and practices of the religions studied.

  • REL-112, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Western Religions

    This course introduces the major western religious traditions. Topics include Zoroastrianism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, beliefs, and practices of the religions studied.

  • REL-211, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Old Testament

    This course is a survey of the literature of the Hebrews with readings from the law, prophets, and other writings. Emphasis is placed on the use of literary, historical, archeological, and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to use the tools of critical analysis to read and understand Old Testament literature.

  • REL-212, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to New Testament

    This course is a survey of the literature of first-century Christianity with readings from the gospels, Acts, and the Pauline and pastoral letters. Topics include the literary structure, audience, and religious perspective of the writings, as well as the historical and cultural context of the early Christian community. Upon completion, students should be able to use the tools of critical analysis to read and understand New Testament literature.

  • REL-221, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Religion in America

    This course is an examination of religious beliefs and practice in the United States. Emphasis is placed on mainstream religious traditions and non-traditional religious movements from the Colonial period to the present. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and appreciate the diversity of religious traditions in America.

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    Information Systems Security (SEC)

  • SEC-110, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Security Concepts

    This course introduces the concepts and issues related to securing information systems and the development of policies to implement information security controls. Topics include the historical view of networking and security, security issues, trends, security resources, and the role of policy, people, and processes in information security. Upon completion, students should be able to identify information security risks, create an information security policy, and identify processes to implement and enforce policy.

  • SEC-160, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Security Administration I

    This course provides an overview of security administration and fundamentals of designing security architectures. Topics include networking technologies, TCP/IP concepts, protocols, network traffic analysis, monitoring, and security best practices. Upon completion, students should be able to identify normal network traffic using network analysis tools and design basic security defenses.

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    Sociology (SOC)

  • SOC-210, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Introduction to Sociology

    This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies.

  • SOC-213, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Sociology of the Family

    This course covers the institution of the family and other intimate relationships. Emphasis is placed on mate selection, gender roles, sexuality, communication, power and conflict, parenthood, diverse lifestyles, divorce and remarriage, and economic issues. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze the family as a social institution and the social forces which influence its development and change.

  • SOC-215, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Group Processes

    This course introduces group processes and dynamics. Emphasis is placed on small group experiences, roles and relationships within groups, communication, cooperation and conflict resolution, and managing diversity within and among groups. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge and skills essential to analyze group interaction and to work effectively in a group context.

  • SOC-230, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Race and Ethnic Relations

    This course includes an examination of the various aspects of race and ethnicity and how these lead to different experiences, opportunities, problems, and contributions. Topics include prejudice, discrimination, perceptions, myths, stereotypes, and intergroup relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze relationships among racial and ethnic groups within the larger society.

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    Spanish (SPA)

  • SPA-111, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014 | Summer 2014
    Elementary Spanish I

    This course introduces the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate cultural awareness.

  • SPA-112, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Elementary Spanish II

    This course is a continuation of SPA 111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate further cultural awareness.

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    Sustainability Technologies (SST)

  • SST-140, Lecture: 3, Credits: 3
    Green Building and Design Concepts

    This course is designed to introduce the student to sustainable building design and construction principles and practices. Topics include sustainable building rating systems and certifications, energy efficiency, indoor environmental quality, sustainable building materials and water use. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the principles and practices of sustainable building design and construction.

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    Transportation (TRN)

  • TRN-110, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Introduction to Transport Technology

    This course covers workplace safety, hazardous materials, environmental regulations, hand tools, service information, basic concepts, vehicle systems, and common transportation industry terminology. Topics include familiarization with major vehicle systems, proper use of various hand and power tools, material safety data sheets, and personal protective equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate appropriate safety procedures, identify and use basic shop tools, and describe government regulations regarding transportation repair facilities.

  • TRN-120, Lecture: 4, Lab: 3, Credits: 5
    Fall 2014
    Basic Transportation Electricity

    This course covers basic electrical theory, wiring diagrams, test equipment, and diagnosis, repair and replacement of batteries, starters, and alternators. Topics include Ohm's Law, circuit construction, wiring diagrams, circuit testing, and basic troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to properly use wiring diagrams, diagnose, test, and repair basic wiring, battery, starting, charging, and electrical concerns.

  • TRN-140, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Transportation Climate Control

    This course covers the theory of refrigeration and heating, electrical/electronic/pneumatic controls, and diagnosis and repair of climate control systems. Topics include diagnosis and repair of climate control components and systems, recovery/recycling of refrigerants, and safety and environmental regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to diagnose and repair vehicle climate control systems.

  • TRN-140A, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Transportation Climate Control Lab

    This course provides experiences for enhancing student skills in the diagnosis and repair of transportation climate control systems. Emphasis is placed on reclaiming, recovery, recharging, leak detection, climate control components, diagnosis, air conditioning equipment, tools and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the operation, diagnose, and safely service climate control systems using appropriate tools, equipment, and service information.

  • TRN-170, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Pc Skills for Transportation

    This course introduces students to personal computer literacy and Internet literacy with an emphasis on the transportation service industry. Topics include service information systems, management systems, computer-based systems, and PC-based diagnostic equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to access information pertaining to transportation technology and perform word processing.

  • TRN-180, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Basic Welding for Transportation

    This course covers the terms and procedures for welding various metals used in the transportation industry with an emphasis on personal safety and environmental health. Topics include safety and precautionary measures, setup/operation of MIG equipment, metal identification methods, types of welds/joints, techniques, inspection methods, cutting processes and other related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of welding operations and safety procedures according to industry standard

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    Work-Based Learning (WBL)

  • WBL-111, Work: 10, Credits: 1
    Fall 2014
    Work-Based Learning I

    This course provides a work-based learning experience with a college-approved employer in an area related to the student's program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies.

  • WBL-112, Work: 20, Credits: 2
    Work-Based Learning I

    This course provides a work-based learning experience with a college-approved employer in an area related to the student's program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies.

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    Web Technologies (WEB)

  • WEB-210, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Web Design

    This course introduces intermediate to advanced web design techniques. Topics include customer expectations, advanced markup language, multimedia technologies, usability and accessibility practices, and techniques for the evaluation of web design. Upon completion, students should be able to employ advanced design techniques to create high impact and highly functional web sites.

  • WEB-250, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Database Driven Websites

    This course introduces dynamic (database-driven) website development. Topics include the use of basic database CRUD statements (create, read, update and delete) incorporated into web applications, as well as in software architecture principles. Upon completion, students should be able to design and develop database driven web applications according to industry standards.

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    Welding (WLD)

  • WLD-110, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Cutting Processes

    This course introduces oxy-fuel and plasma-arc cutting systems. Topics include safety, proper equipment setup, and operation of oxy-fuel and plasma-arc cutting equipment with emphasis on straight line, curve and bevel cutting. Upon completion, students should be able to oxy-fuel and plasma-arc cut metals of varying thickness.

  • WLD-112, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Fall 2014
    Basic Welding Processes

    This course introduces basic welding and cutting. Emphasis is placed on beads applied with gases, mild steel fillers, and electrodes and the capillary action of solder. Upon completion, students should be able to set up welding and oxy-fuel equipment and perform welding, brazing, and soldering processes.

  • WLD-115, Lecture: 2, Lab: 9, Credits: 5
    Fall 2014
    SMAW (Stick) Plate

    This course introduces the shielded metal arc (stick) welding process. Emphasis is placed on padding, fillet, and groove welds in various positions with SMAW electrodes. Upon completion, students should be able to perform SMAW fillet and groove welds on carbon plate with prescribed electrodes.

  • WLD-116, Lecture: 1, Lab: 9, Credits: 4
    SMAW (stick) Plate/Pipe

    This course is designed to enhance skills with the shielded metal arc (stick) welding process. Emphasis is placed on advancing manipulative skills with SMAW electrodes on varying joint geometry. Upon completion, students should be able to perform groove welds on carbon steel with prescribed electrodes in the flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions.

  • WLD-117, Lecture: 1, Lab: 4, Credits: 3
    Summer 2014
    Industrial SMAW

    This course introduces the SMAW (stick) process for joining carbon steel components for industrial applications. Topics include padding, fillet, and groove welds in various positions with SMAW electrodes. Upon completion, student should be able to safely perform SMAW fillet and groove welds on carbon steel plate with prescribed electrodes.

  • WLD-121, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    GMAW (MIG) FCAW/Plate

    This course introduces metal arc welding and flux core arc welding processes. Topics include equipment setup and fillet and groove welds with emphasis on application of GMAW and FCAW electrodes on carbon steel plate. Upon completion, students should be able to perform fillet welds on carbon steel with prescribed electrodes in the flat, horizontal, and overhead positions.

  • WLD-122, Lecture: 1, Lab: 6, Credits: 3
    GMAW (MIG) Plate/Pipe

    This course is designed to enhance skills with the gas metal arc (MIG) welding process. Emphasis is placed on advancing skills with the GMAW process making groove welds on carbon steel plate and pipe in various positions. Upon completion, students should be able to perform groove welds with prescribed electrodes on various joint geometry.

  • WLD-131, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    GTAW (TIG) Plate

    This course introduces the gas tungsten arc (TIG) welding process. Topics include correct selection of tungsten, polarity, gas, and proper filler rod with emphasis placed on safety, equipment setup, and welding techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to perform GTAW fillet and groove welds with various electrodes and filler materials.

  • WLD-132, Lecture: 1, Lab: 6, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    GTAW (TIG) Plate/Pipe

    This course is designed to enhance skills with the gas tungsten arc (TIG) welding process. Topics include setup, joint preparation, and electrode selection with emphasis on manipulative skills in all welding positions on plate and pipe. Upon completion, students should be able to perform GTAW welds with prescribed electrodes and filler materials on various joint geometry.

  • WLD-141, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Symbols and Specifications

    This course introduces the basic symbols and specifications used in welding. Emphasis is placed on interpretation of lines, notes, welding symbols, and specifications. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret symbols and specifications commonly used in welding.

  • WLD-151, Lecture: 2, Lab: 6, Credits: 4
    Fabrication I

    This course introduces the basic principles of fabrication. Emphasis is placed on safety, measurement, layout techniques, cutting, joining techniques, and the use of fabrication tools and equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to perform layout activities and operate various fabrication and material handling equipment.

  • WLD-212, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Inert Gas Welding

    This course introduces inert gas-shielded welding methods (MIG/TIG). Topics include correct selection of consumable and non-consumable electrodes, equipment setup, safety, and welding techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to perform inert gas welding in flat, horizontal, and overhead positions.

  • WLD-215, Lecture: 1, Lab: 9, Credits: 4
    Fall 2014
    SMAW (stick) Pipe

    This course covers the knowledge and skills that apply to welding pipe. Topics include pipe positions, joint geometry, and preparation with emphasis placed on bead application, profile, and discontinuities. Upon completion, students should be able to perform SMAW welds to applicable codes on carbon steel pipe with prescribed electrodes in various positions.

  • WLD-231, Lecture: 1, Lab: 6, Credits: 3
    GTAW (TIG) Pipe

    This course covers gas tungsten arc welding on pipe. Topics include joint preparation and fit up with emphasis placed on safety, GTAW welding technique, bead application, and joint geometry. Upon completion, students should be able to perform GTAW welds to applicable codes on pipe with prescribed electrodes and filler materials in various pipe positions.

  • WLD-261, Lecture: 1, Lab: 3, Credits: 2
    Certification Practices

    This course covers certification requirements for industrial welding processes. Topics include techniques and certification requirements for prequalified joint geometry. Upon completion, students should be able to perform welds on carbon steel plate and/or pipe according to applicable codes.

  • WLD-262, Lecture: 2, Lab: 2, Credits: 3
    Fall 2014
    Inspection & Testing

    This course introduces destructive and non-destructive testing methods. Emphasis is placed on safety, types and methods of testing, and the use of testing equipment and materials. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and/or perform a variety of destructive and non-destructive testing processes.

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    Wood Products (WPP)

  • WPP-125, Lecture: 1, Lab: 2, Credits: 2
    Wood Identification

    This course introduces the laboratory identification of wood from gross characteristics. Topics include softwood and hardwood species. Upon completion, students should be able to identify a minimum of twenty commercial woods.